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Old 02-29-2016, 07:49 AM   #51
CrimsonFox
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Join Date: Dec 2009
Okay trying this out by hiring Aussie Jonathan Kemp
Practice rounds are training?

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Old 02-29-2016, 07:57 AM   #52
digamma
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Yes, you should sign up for both singles and doubles practice. So long as your fatigue is in line, you'll get 5 singles matches and 5 doubles matches, and depending on the competition, you can generate several hundred Experience points for the week.
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Old 02-29-2016, 08:03 AM   #53
CrimsonFox
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oh wait...i did a friendly match.

I just signed up for a tournament too.
it seems i can't unsignup. ah well still learning.
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Old 02-29-2016, 08:08 AM   #54
law90026
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrimsonFox View Post
oh wait...i did a friendly match.

I just signed up for a tournament too.
it seems i can't unsignup. ah well still learning.

Yeah I went through a lot of silly mistakes at the start too. Great thing is that you can just reset your career in the world once you get the hang of things and start over. In a fast world, things move quickly enough that you don't feel like you've wasted took much time.
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Old 02-29-2016, 02:35 PM   #55
Brian Swartz
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You can un-sign up for practice or other tournaments(just uncheck the box and click Sign Up again). Friendlies start immediately though so you are stuck with those.
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Old 02-29-2016, 02:37 PM   #56
Brian Swartz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digamma
Anyone thought about hard constraints on Talent when hiring a new youngster?

I'd say at least 4.0 but it really depends on what's available(i.e., the more competition in a world the tougher it is to find quality so you have to change your standards). I always took the approach of finding the best overall young player I could find, then regularly looking for someone better.

Last edited by Brian Swartz : 02-29-2016 at 02:37 PM.
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Old 02-29-2016, 02:49 PM   #57
Alf
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Originally Posted by Alf View Post
Fremont has been fired and I hired a younger promising Belarus guy.

Nikolay Piontkowsky

Name YATStSpMESkSeDC
N. Piontkowsky
14+5%4.32.323.51.70.90.60.343

Given his aging factor, I am hoping for a solid Junior career. He has already won 3 JG5 singles tournament and 2 JG5 doubles tournament.
He is also selected in Belarus U15 Junior team Cup (good idea ?).

Any comment appreciated
bump as it stuck in page 1
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Old 03-01-2016, 09:10 AM   #58
law90026
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Brian, how accurate roughly do you think your talent evaluation calculation works? I've been fiddling around with it and, assuming a player is able to develop to 5 skill and 4 serve, it seems mentality is a huge part of it. I've done some calculations on some of the 15/16 year olds in world 2 and they come in potentially at 9.79-9.8+ and I'm wondering whether to try developing them instead.
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Old 03-02-2016, 05:57 AM   #59
Brian Swartz
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Well I think the formula works well for a player's strength, but it's definitely not perfect. Generally speaking, surface strengths being equal(they play a significant role), I'll usually win against players who are more than 0.3 weaker, and lose if they are 0.3 stronger. Within that +/- 0.3 things are a lot more iffy, but I've also seen losses against players with a gap as high as 0.6 or 0.7 on occasion. There seems to be a hidden 'hot/cold' thing going on. Take a look at Cestmir Marcek in my dynasty, he just has no business being the world no.4 but he is and had a heck of a year, better than when he actually had higher ratings as a younger player. So it's a 'baseline', and works good as a general guideline, but players are humans and stuff happens .

The other thing is, a player with high mentality and low athleticism/technical skill does seem to underperform a bit. I think this is basically because they aren't good enough to get into enough 'key points' with a player who is somewhat better in skill but lower mentality; i.e., their clutchness or whatever doesn't come into play. So I'd definitely suggest that it's better to have a player with good athleticism and mentality then it is to have one with average athleticism and great mentality. Balance is best I think.

The final point; you may be incorrect in assuming you can get a 15 or 16-year-old player to 5.0 skill, 4.0 serve. If they've been misused for a year or two a lot of the potential is wasted. If you have a couple examples of these kinds of players I can take a look at them, but usually I might consider a particularly good 15-year-old, at 16 or more I think it would be rare to find one that was very worthwhile.

.02.
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Old 03-02-2016, 06:02 AM   #60
Brian Swartz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alf
bump as it stuck in page 1

Good bump, I missed it. First of all, you always want to play things like the JTC if you can for a developing player. They have much better xp than anything else you can do. So absolutely let him play them.

** Athleticism -- peaks at 3.2 str, 2.7 spd. That's solid, not great but not terrible either.
** Mentality and talent are good, endurance will peak at 3.3 which is passable.

Definitely should be a good juniors player, with obviously a relatively short professional career. I wouldn't throw him back, you can do some fun things with a player like this.
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Old 03-02-2016, 10:36 AM   #61
law90026
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Swartz View Post
Well I think the formula works well for a player's strength, but it's definitely not perfect. Generally speaking, surface strengths being equal(they play a significant role), I'll usually win against players who are more than 0.3 weaker, and lose if they are 0.3 stronger. Within that +/- 0.3 things are a lot more iffy, but I've also seen losses against players with a gap as high as 0.6 or 0.7 on occasion. There seems to be a hidden 'hot/cold' thing going on. Take a look at Cestmir Marcek in my dynasty, he just has no business being the world no.4 but he is and had a heck of a year, better than when he actually had higher ratings as a younger player. So it's a 'baseline', and works good as a general guideline, but players are humans and stuff happens .

The other thing is, a player with high mentality and low athleticism/technical skill does seem to underperform a bit. I think this is basically because they aren't good enough to get into enough 'key points' with a player who is somewhat better in skill but lower mentality; i.e., their clutchness or whatever doesn't come into play. So I'd definitely suggest that it's better to have a player with good athleticism and mentality then it is to have one with average athleticism and great mentality. Balance is best I think.

The final point; you may be incorrect in assuming you can get a 15 or 16-year-old player to 5.0 skill, 4.0 serve. If they've been misused for a year or two a lot of the potential is wasted. If you have a couple examples of these kinds of players I can take a look at them, but usually I might consider a particularly good 15-year-old, at 16 or more I think it would be rare to find one that was very worthwhile.

.02.

Thanks, very helpful as always!
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Old 03-02-2016, 11:59 AM   #62
BishopMVP
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I've reached a bit of an inflection point in World 12, as my boy Tommy Simms finally reached the top 32... now I'm wondering if it's worth tanking to stay out of the year end top 30 for one more year (and avoid all the required Masters tournaments indoor/on clay.)

I also think this is the last time I take an American (or a big country player). Simms was a created guy with physical stats too good to pass up when he popped up on the waiver wire, but missing out on all those sweet, juicy, JTC/WTC points will probably prevent him from really being a threat for #1.
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Old 03-02-2016, 12:44 PM   #63
Brian Swartz
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I personally wouldn't recommend tanking. You need to cross over to playing all the Masters eventually -- your ranking is going to go up, Simms is still getting better. Plus you get better xp for Masters matches than run-of-the-mill ones, and can always play doubles to make the week worthwhile if you expect to lose early. Strong player, better athlete than I've ever had, I'm pretty jealous! I also wouldn't worry so much about the WTC. If you are good enough to compete for #1, you'll be good enough to be on the US team -- it's only 600 points maximum and that's if you win every singles tie you can play. Relatively speaking that's chump change for a Top 5 guy.

Once again, just my .02.
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Old 03-02-2016, 01:20 PM   #64
BishopMVP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Swartz View Post
I personally wouldn't recommend tanking. You need to cross over to playing all the Masters eventually -- your ranking is going to go up, Simms is still getting better. Plus you get better xp for Masters matches than run-of-the-mill ones, and can always play doubles to make the week worthwhile if you expect to lose early. Strong player, better athlete than I've ever had, I'm pretty jealous! I also wouldn't worry so much about the WTC. If you are good enough to compete for #1, you'll be good enough to be on the US team -- it's only 600 points maximum and that's if you win every singles tie you can play. Relatively speaking that's chump change for a Top 5 guy.

Once again, just my .02.
Yeah, I'm leaning against tanking, especially since I need to get my form up near the max soon. Didn't realize I can't play challengers as a top 32 ranked player either.

I'm not talking about the ranking points, I'm talking about training/experience points. I feel like especially as a junior with low endurance, being able to get experience at 1.5/2x fatigue in a JTC is a big advantage (that you've used to the extreme in your Sri Lankan dynasty!)
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Old 03-04-2016, 09:20 AM   #65
digamma
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Brian,
I'd love to see what you think about my American in World 11, Ron Ashman.

I also have a Croat, Teodor Cajkanovic, who is knocking on the door of the top 32, but I think he is not going to get much better than that, due to low endurance and high aging factor. He's been fun though.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:02 PM   #66
Brian Swartz
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Rather bland in appearance, looks like he had some sort of bizarre mouth-shrinking surgery. Smells quite funny also.

Oh, that's not what you meant?

Good, talented athlete. Endurance isn't enough to be great, but it's enough to be successful. Probably because of this, his current technical attributes are good but not elite for his age.

I'll just pop one small bit of unsolicited advice: he's playing too many tournaments. Aside from that though, definitely a quality challenger player and should become more than that. A few months past his 22nd birthday and he's at 8.86, a rough guess is that he reaches 9.4-9.5 and is a solid Top 10 to Top 5 player at his apex depending of course on what other competition is out there. Good example of a guy who has some of everything, esp. athleticism. Not quite enough to really distinguish himself or be an all-time great, but still a very good player.
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Old 03-05-2016, 03:24 PM   #67
Alf
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Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Rennes, France
N. Piontkowsky has just had his 15th birthday and is winning JG5s now. I mistakenly enlisted him for JG2 where he lost, but I alm trying JG4 now and he is winning again.

In terms of development, playing and wining JG4/JG3 is better than practice or not ?

Still not sure what schedule to give him in terms of tournament vs practice . And when entering tournaments, what JG should I aim for now at his stage ?

Thanks for the help.
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Old 03-05-2016, 11:21 PM   #68
NevStar
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Until you get good enough for JGS & JGA events, practice will give much better XP. As a junior, it's best to only do enough tournaments to avoid getting a form penalty.
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Old 03-06-2016, 03:05 AM   #69
Alf
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Originally Posted by NevStar View Post
Until you get good enough for JGS & JGA events, practice will give much better XP. As a junior, it's best to only do enough tournaments to avoid getting a form penalty.

Thanks
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Old 03-06-2016, 04:10 AM   #70
Brian Swartz
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Agreed. IMO that continues to be best until you reach the Top 32 as a pro.
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Old 03-06-2016, 04:16 AM   #71
Alf
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Location: Rennes, France
You only gain ranking points by playing in tournaments, so to get into top32, you (at some point) need to win some ranking points by playing tournaments. Correct ?
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Last edited by Alf : 03-06-2016 at 04:16 AM.
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Old 03-06-2016, 04:44 AM   #72
Brian Swartz
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Sure, but you don't need to play a ton of tournaments in order to do that. Even if you only play enough to keep your form above 15, you are still going to play 10-11 approximately a year. You can only count 18 at maximum in your ranking.

In my experience so far, the way it happens is basically that if you are good enough to be a consistent threat to win the big challengers(CH1 and CH+) then you will get yourself into the Top 32 even if you only play a dozen events a year or whatever. Playing more at that point will get you there a bit faster ... but not that much faster, and playing more also hurts your development overall since in regular tournaments you are winning most of your matches if you are entering the right events, and the loser gets the most experience. At the same level, in practice tournaments you will get a mix of wins and losses, and also have a much better guaranteed number of matches, allowing you to develop faster.

Everyone should do what they think is best, and I'm open to counter-arguments, but that's the way I approach it.
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Old 03-06-2016, 04:51 AM   #73
Alf
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Location: Rennes, France
Makes sense. I didn't know about the 18 tournaments counting only.

Next question regarding my other player in regards to the objective to get a trainer :
Jasen Džodanović : the guy is 25, he is winning FT3 tournaments, I like him (he is a grass specialist).
but
I encounterd that other guy
Claudio Albertrani : the guy is 27yr and 44wk, but is still a top 50 player. I am about to fire Jasen Dzodanovic to get Claudio (it would cost me 505 hiring points).

Is that a "sound" move ? He looks like a potential great trainer.
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Old 03-06-2016, 05:10 AM   #74
Brian Swartz
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If you want to get a trainer, and I totally agree that you should want to, I would go for someone who is old enough to get there a lot more quickly. Even a great player will need to be well into their 30s by the time they are skilled enough to be a 5.0 trainer. Albertrani would be about a 4.0 at best right now(estimating, but I'm sure it's not very far off). You can do a lot better. For example, Dimos Sanroma is 35 and about a 4.5 right now, and there are others much closer such as Shinzue Kentaro who by my calculations is probably over 4.9 already. I have yet to see a world that doesn't have great trainer candidates available, most of them will be in their mid-30s or so and already at 4.7-4.8 or so. These players require a relatively minimal amount of work to convert into a strong trainer. Albertrani will need years of work that in this case isn't necessary.

Last edited by Brian Swartz : 03-06-2016 at 05:10 AM.
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Old 03-06-2016, 05:23 AM   #75
Alf
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Gotcha.
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Old 03-07-2016, 11:45 PM   #76
BishopMVP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Swartz View Post
This is exactly what I do: skill until it's at least double the service cost. The logic here is that skill is used on all points, service on only half. Most managers train service more than I do but I'm not sure that's a good idea. The reason for that is higher service will help in terms of 'free points'; that is, more aces(and fewer double faults, but that's less of an issue at the top level). Other side of the 'free points' coin is having slightly better odds on each point by going the skill route. I think being close to the line where skill is double the service cost is best, but maybe one could argue for having service at 60% of skill cost. I wouldn't go more than that though.
I've generally used the 2:1 ratio here, but I've been doing some contemplating. Particularly in that really tough 19-23 range where you're fighting to make the top 30 I wonder if it might be worth bumping serve up to 3.9/4.0 early under the theory it'd lead to more close matches. When I was hanging around that 4.7/3.2 range it seemed like I was getting broken constantly and thus blown out by every (near) world class player, but then blowing out all the early round opponents in challengers. With the training point penalty for matches that are less than 60% won by one side, I do wonder if focusing more on serve during that critical junction would have led to more close matches, and ideally more 3/5 setters. Didn't do a deep dive though, so it could just be me reading too much into what, imo, is easily the most frustrating period.

So this isn't entirely rambling, let's talk about Court Preferences. These can play a significant role, certainly during the initial years, but even at the highest level they play a big role each week. My goal right now is to get as close to a 60/40/0/0 split as I can on my players, making sure that one of Hard/Clay is built up, and then tailoring his secondary one based off his current percentages when I pick him up or maybe what courts seem most prominent in his country. (I know that's dumb, but when it's not a big difference I also try signing up for tournaments geographically close to his home country... unnecessary sure, but helps a little with my immersion!) I'm not sure if they are solely based off what percentage of your past matches have been on each surface or there is a little bit of hard coding built in for individual players, but they're definitely fairly set in stone by age 21/22. One other thing to note is that by that top level I've arrived at (Tommy Simms just turned 23, 4.9/3.6, ranked #23), practice sessions on grass (his secondary preference at 35%) are much less useful than practice sessions on hard/clay, partly because he's one of the best players in the world on grass but mostly because very few top players end up in those, and even being placed in Tier 1 I'd only get 2 decent practice matches at best in a week. So if you do try specializing in grass/indoor it might be worth baking a couple extra points in during those 18-22 year old years, because you'll likely be losing them once you're in the top 30 and playing such a varied schedule/dominating most practice opponents below the top 50.
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Old 03-09-2016, 05:22 AM   #77
Brian Swartz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BishopMVP
Particularly in that really tough 19-23 range where you're fighting to make the top 30 ... imo, is easily the most frustrating period.

You're not wrong, which would make you correct here. It's all about patience for that time period. I'm going through it for the third time starting very soon and within a game year I expect to be thoroughly annoyed but you just have to wait for things to take their course. With the rest of your comments I need to be much less dogmatic than usual though. There are still some things about the game I don't know.

You are right in that better serving does lead to closer matches, just need to look at what happens on grass to see that. What I think would happen is that you would see closer matches but also more losses, how big the effect would be depends of course on how much extra you put into the serve. My approach has always been to try and 'stay in my lane' and not play events where I'm going to get killed by world-class players: in challengers you don't run into many unless it's the end of the tournament, and at that point sort of who cares? I've always approached tournaments in the philosophy that the goal is boosting form and not worried too much about the quality of matches I get -- that's what practice weeks are for. I think this is the best way, but I can't prove it by any stretch.

I'm even less certain about the court preferences thing, which is related. I've used friendly matches to 'correct' to where I want to be in these, but that's because I need friendlies and don't have a trainer. I'll get my first at the end of the current game year, though that's still several weeks away in real-life time. How to properly adapt to using a trainer, since their sessions don't correct preferences among other differences, is something I need to play around with and don't completely have a handle on. I figure I probably know about 80-90% of what I can learn about strategy for the game, but this is the biggest missing piece that I'll need to get into. I do almost all my practice weeks on hardcourt right now for my top players so they can get good competition, but no doubt I'll have to approach it differently to some degree once I am able to get better xp, but lose the surface correction aspect of friendlies. I'll need to experiment before I have a good handle on what's best.

Really good post though, I think your mind is in the right direction.
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Old 03-11-2016, 10:42 AM   #78
britrock88
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Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: WI via ND via NC
Question: are trainers actually force-retired at age 60? My 5.0 trainer in GW2 is 56, so it's time to think about this...
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Old 03-11-2016, 01:08 PM   #79
Brian Swartz
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I'm 90% sure they are. I don't know if they raised the retirement age from 60 to 65 when they upped the trainer age from 40 to 45, but I think it's still at 60 -- I don't think I've seen any older than that. I do not know for sure though.
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Old 03-14-2016, 11:38 AM   #80
Alf
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Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Rennes, France
I have seen a 64yr44xk old trainer on gameworld 11


Trainer: Demyan Fedorenko

Prize Money$6,331,761
Managerlq4868540
Age64y44wk (0%)
Aging factor100%
Fatigue0 (100%)
Form0 (Skill -1.5, Service -1.5, Experience 55%)
Singles W-L794 - 362
Doubles W-L511 - 262
Partner-
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Last edited by Alf : 03-14-2016 at 11:49 AM.
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Old 03-14-2016, 12:01 PM   #81
Brian Swartz
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Wrong again! Must be 65 now.
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Old 03-16-2016, 07:02 AM   #82
law90026
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Join Date: Jan 2006
When would be the best time to stop playing doubles? Reaching top 100? 50?
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Old 03-16-2016, 10:40 AM   #83
britrock88
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It's a YMMV situation. For instance, right now I'm ruing the fact that Mendez/Lebedyenko have done well enough in their few doubles entries (the GSLs plus a couple others for form purposes) that they reached the top 200 and can't play in futures-level doubles tourneys during the year-end dead period.

I would say quit fairly early--once you're playing challengers and maintaining form. After that point, doubles becomes a tool to keep up players' form during the peaks and troughs of the tournament schedule.
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Old 03-16-2016, 10:45 AM   #84
law90026
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That's actually a really good point re year end doubles!
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Old 03-16-2016, 07:46 PM   #85
BishopMVP
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Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Concord, MA/UMass
With my mid-20's ranked player and top 10 Junior player in rr11, I jump in the occasional doubles field for Masters/JGA's, or more frequently Grand Slam's, especially on bad surfaces for me to try and ensure I get some decent training for the week. (It is worth noting that qualifiers for even Grand Slams do not give extra XP, but count equally as 1 match for form.)

So yes, I completely agree that Doubles should be used only as a tool for controlling form, usually either where you fear an early exit or if there are no majors coming up and you want to jack up that form in an FT/CH so you can get a few weeks of practice in in a row.
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Old 03-16-2016, 09:18 PM   #86
Brian Swartz
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I approach it a little different it seems. I always play singles and doubles until I reach elite status(Top 32) as a singles player. Then I mostly stop playing, only as a tool to control form as mentioned in an event I'm already playing. I.e., I'll add in a doubles entry in a Slam or Masters if I'm a bit low on form but not enough to justify another tournament ahead of time. I play extra tournaments in the post-Shanghai(week 42) period in order to boost form so I don't need to worry about the year-end period.
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Old 03-18-2016, 04:01 AM   #87
Brian Swartz
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Join Date: May 2006
The Master's Wheel

Thought it might be useful in terms of recent discussions and developments to go into a little more detail on how I view and approach reaching the top of the sport. There's a couple of people with elite players now and more on the way(well done, ya'll!). For this exercise my example is Teo Rask from law90026(not to be confused with law90027)'s World 2 dynasty thread: A Rocking Rackets Dynasty (World 2) - Front Office Football Central

The name 'Master's Wheel' is just basically an illustration; being as I am a massive geek/nerd, it's a reference to the Mask of Zorro and the 'training' scene with Hopkins and Banderas: The Mask of Zorro (1/8) Movie CLIP - Master and Pupil (1998) HD - YouTube. As one advances up the rankings, as the man says, 'with each new circle your world contracts'. In this case, each circle inward is half the size of the one preceding it, because math, as follows:

** Challenger Wannabes -- The great unwashed masses from 33rd down through pretty much the rest of the Top 100. A cesspool of overplayed journeymen combined with declining former stars and rising talents. Most will never amount to a thing, but there are a few diamonds who will find their way through the morass.

** Outer Circle(Top 32) -- Emerging from said morass is Teo Rask this recently-begun season, having ranked 28th in the previous year. This is the most significant transition point from a scheduling point of view that a player will ever encounter. Prior to this, through juniors, amateurs if chosen, futures, and challengers, you can for the most part choose how often you play as befits your strategy. Now the game is different though; Slams + Mandatory Masters will make up 12 of the 18 events in the ranking pool going forward, and challengers are no longer permitted. The schedule is mostly chosen for you, and only consistent success in these big events will allow further progress. Therefore great care must be taken to peak at the right time; the point at which you will face higher-ranked opponents in the big tournaments. This point changes a bit depending on what circle you find yourself in, but the basic approach does not.

** Seeded Everywhere(Top 16) -- At this point a player is seeded at even the smaller Masters. The Round of 16 is now the focal point for peak performance.

** World Tour Qualifiers(Top 8) -- Elite enough that you get your own 'bonus tournament' at the end of the year. Most who make it here have aspirations to be Slam champions and/or world #1s at some stage.

** True Contenders(Top 4) -- For those who have reached the mountaintop, and expect to be active at the business end of almost any tournament they enter.


An Unsettling Transition

Getting back to our hero, Teo Rask; he's taken a step or two into the Outer Circle once or twice only to fall back out in a very competitive game world, but now he appears to be there to stay. There's a real 'fight or flight' reality to this, as in the last year 10 of his top 13 tournament results were challengers, and events at that now-forbidden level accounted for over 57% of his points total to start the new year. Most of them were in the second half of the season; it seemed that beginning with the Nottingham Challenger in week 25, right in the middle of the so-called 'Channel Slams' of the late spring and early summer, he really started stepping forward in his consistency of results. That ultimately led him to reaching elite status in the tour.

As I mentioned in the run-down above, the biggest thing is peaking for the right point of the big events in terms of form. For someone in the Outer Circle(Top 32), that is still a bit tricky. For Slams and the big Masters(Indian Wells and Miami), the goal is to reach peak form(low 20s) by the third round or just beforehand. This way, if an opportunity presents itself through a good draw, unprepared opponent, unexpected upset, etc., you are poised to break through and make a deep run to propel yourself up the rankings. For the smaller Masters, it's really the beginning of the tournament since you can meet anyone from 17th on down from the start; only the Top 16 are seeded.

The other point I would mention is that 250s and 500s are now 'fill-in' events. Their primary purpose is not to get more points though of course they help there, and you should choose the events you can be most successful at. The main thing is to get your form to where you want it to be ahead of the next big tournament on the calendar. Everything else should be secondary to that, since even if you load up on 500/250 points, the players who rise to the top will be those consistently doing well in the more lucrative Masters and Slams. Better to lose a battle(less points in the smaller events) than to lose the war.

When you move from challengers to the elite-based schedule, there's always a lot of big-points weeks you can't replace right away, certainly not by defending them directly. The ranking will bounce around quite a bit. I find it's useful to focus on what matters; consistently getting to the round of 32 or beyond in the big tournaments is quite sufficient to make progress and in fact the only real way to do it. All the ups and downs and yo-yoing will sort itself out eventually.
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Old 03-18-2016, 05:18 AM   #88
law90026
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Great insights as always. As I play more of this game, I realise that a lot of what you've said is incredibly accurate, especially things like not overplaying. It's not worth chasing points because your player needs to be ready for the next stage otherwise he gets knocked out early anyways.
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Old 03-23-2016, 05:02 PM   #89
Brian Swartz
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Excellent. There is an issue you(and many others I'm sure) could potentially help me out on. In about a month real-life time, at the end of the current game year and we've just reached Roland Garros, I will be getting my first trainer. For those that already use them, some stuff will be different I'm sure due to faster/slower game worlds and whatnot, but I'm curious what you've learned about trainers through the process? Specifically anything that might not have been obvious at first? I'm curious if there are any insights, have some thoughts of my own that I'm working on and I'll do a longer post on it when the time comes, but I'm looking forward to going trainer more and more, partly because it's been a relatively crappy year on the courts for my players this year.
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Old 03-23-2016, 06:35 PM   #90
Alf
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How do you actually use those trainers ?

Is it while not entering tournaments nor practice ? Or is in in parallel of tournaments and practice ?
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Old 03-23-2016, 07:57 PM   #91
law90026
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My thoughts below.

For Trainers, they don't necessarily synergise well with practice weeks. Reason being that a player can sometimes be held out of matches if their fatigue is too high, and that can sometimes be anything in excess of 200, rather than the 300 theoretical cut-off.

What I've found is that I can only confidently use my trainer from Friday onwards after the last practice matches are done.

Trainers tend to be useful during tournament weeks where it is possible to maintain the 300 fatigue cap.

In theory, I suspect a good trainer might actually get you more xp than a practice week. Using Iker Gauba as an example, he gets Teo Rask about 19-21 xp each session and the fatigue cost is about 23-32 each time. If you start from 0 fatigue, that should theroretically allow me to get in between 22 to 24 sessions in a week, which would be about 428 to 456 xp. This is higher than what I normally get for a practice week unless it was a very good week in terms of number of matches and the quality of matches. The issue I face is the micro-management aspect of it in a faster world plus the fact you seldom start from such a Low fatigue level.

Bear in mind as well that Iker is only a 4.4 trainer so a 5.0 trainer would be even more effective I suspect.

Last edited by law90026 : 03-23-2016 at 07:58 PM.
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Old 03-23-2016, 10:12 PM   #92
Brian Swartz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alf
Or is in in parallel of tournaments and practice ?

Primarily this. The obvious scenario is when you have more fatigue than you use during the week. This can happen for practice weeks especially for particularly high-endurance players; it can also happen if you unexpectedly lose early in a tournament. One example that can be common at a certain career stage is for example losing in the quarterfinals of a Slam or one of the two-week masters events. Then you only get one match, and have to fill the rest of the week through friendlies. Trainers are better than friendlies.

What law said about training possibly being better than practice weeks in some cases is interesting to me though. That's the kind of thing I'll need to experiment with.
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Old 03-24-2016, 12:08 AM   #93
kingfc22
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Oh man. Why did I click on the Dynasty Thread? Now I'm going to get sucked in.
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Old 03-26-2016, 01:57 PM   #94
kingfc22
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Read this thread a couple of time and still a little foggy in one thing. When your player is not in a tournament, that will lower their form to an acceptable level. But during these weeks are friendlies or practice tournaments the right strategy or are these players simply taking the week off
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Old 03-26-2016, 03:02 PM   #95
Brian Swartz
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As far as having form too high, you want to play practice tournaments. Friendlies are a last resort if you have no other way to use your available fatigue(they're better than nothing).
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Old 03-26-2016, 03:09 PM   #96
britrock88
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Only competitive tournaments contribute to form. But any play contributes to fatigue. The trick is keeping your form in the 15-30 range while consistently using your fatigue allotment to earn XP to improve your players' abilities.
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Old 03-26-2016, 03:18 PM   #97
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Originally Posted by Brian Swartz View Post
As far as having form too high, you want to play practice tournaments. Friendlies are a last resort if you have no other way to use your available fatigue(they're better than nothing).

Quote:
Originally Posted by britrock88 View Post
Only competitive tournaments contribute to form. But any play contributes to fatigue. The trick is keeping your form in the 15-30 range while consistently using your fatigue allotment to earn XP to improve your players' abilities.

Got it. Now it all makes sense
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Old 03-27-2016, 05:23 PM   #98
kingfc22
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How often do "new players" show up in the for hire section? Is their a weekly, quarterly, etc influx?
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Old 03-27-2016, 06:39 PM   #99
law90026
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My understanding is that it's either every Monday in the gameworld or Everyday (based on some posts in the game forums).

Which world are you playing in?
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Old 03-27-2016, 06:49 PM   #100
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Originally Posted by law90026 View Post
My understanding is that it's either every Monday in the gameworld or Everyday (based on some posts in the game forums).

Which world are you playing in?

Two players in World 3 and two players in World 4
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