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Old 05-26-2005, 09:37 PM   #101
SelzShoes
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Join Date: Apr 2005
1878-A Return to "True Sport": History Repeating!

From the Chicago Eagle
When the two best clubs are compared, our Browns and the champion Brooklyns, the differences in style are stark. The Brooklyns appeal to the vulgar crank by attempting to outscore the opposition with little regard to what the East used to refer to as ‘inside base ball’. A tally of 8 or 9 a game is not unusual for this crew of batsman. Expecting such production on a daily basis, the Atlantics are unsurprisingly lax when it comes to catching the ball or making the toss towards home.
Our Brownies however excel in the type of ball that creates champions. While not as impressive as the Brooklyns with the bat, our boys can handle the stick better than any other squad in the land. Patrolling the field no club is better at turning the sure hit into an out. And the hurlers are beyond compare.
Yes, when the ledger is balanced, the crank who values the thinking man’s game will cast his lot with Chicago.

At the halfway point of the season two things were becoming clear: Brooklyn had put together possibly the greatest hitting club in league history and Chicago had put together possibly the best pitching club in league history.

The Browns were no slouches with the lumber either, but at the midpoint had scored 70 fewer runs than the Atlantics. Stollings, who held the record for doubles with 43 already had 30. The leader board show Brooklyn dominating in every respect: 3 Atlantics hitting over .411, 3 Atlantics with at least 40 runs scored, and so in any category that mattered.

Chicago’s pitching was the opposite; not one man, save Cherokee Kinan was putting up elite numbers across the board—but the club totals were just as dominating. Fewest runs, walks and hits allowed, coupled with the most batters struck kept them in every game.

When Brooklyn begun the second half sweeping the Browns, Obie McCormick sprung into action. The first attempt to improve the club, acquireing Frank Richardson, failed when Richardson refused to report. Rather than try to force Richardson to come to Chicago, a process that could have eaten up precious weeks, McCormick turned towards Buffalo.

The Eries had fallen on hard times in their second season. The excitement of the Empire had worn off and the drawing power of a below average club out of the race at midseason held little appeal. Holding two solid players making the league maximum, secondbaseman Raymond Flake and leftfielder Guy McGurk, who fit just what the Browns needed the chance for a swap was seized. The younger and cheaper Arnold Woody and Kurt Witty went to Buffalo in what the papers labeled a ‘challenge’ trade, since the clubs swapped starters at both positions. Instead of sparking a charge to first, the pitching suddenly gave way and set in motion a 9 game losing streak. During the same period, the Atlantics went 8-1. The race was effectively over.

But drama still remained. Just as the Atlantics were ready to pull away, Clarence Walters, one of the players who had been over .400 for most of the year suffered a major leg injury. And the nightmare began again for the Atlantics. Slowly but surely the lead began to shrink. With seven games to go, the Atlantics only had a 3 game lead. With the season on the line, and the common crank wondering if gamblers had reached Pannell as they had allegedly done in Philadelphia, the Brooklyns won 6 of their remaining games. The Browns could only counter with two.

The difference had been the nine game losing streak. Brooklyn went from tied, to 8 games ahead. Thaddeus Hamilton had his untainted championship.
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Old 05-26-2005, 09:55 PM   #102
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Thaddeus Hamilton had his untainted championship.

Hooray!!!!!!!!
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Old 05-26-2005, 10:52 PM   #103
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1878--A Return to "True Sport": Champions

Code:
Team W L PCT GB Home Away XInn 1Run Brooklyn 64 34 .653 - 29-20 35-14 4-2 18- 9 Chicago 57 41 .582 7.0 32-17 25-24 6-3 18-16 Boston 50 48 .510 14.0 28-21 22-27 3-2 18-18 Philadelphia 50 48 .510 14.0 29-20 21-28 3-2 23-11 Indianapolis 49 49 .500 15.0 32-17 17-32 6-6 14-22 Buffalo 44 54 .449 20.0 24-25 20-29 4-4 19-18 Detroit 41 57 .418 23.0 22-27 19-30 5-7 11-17 Cincinnati 37 61 .378 27.0 19-30 18-31 3-8 10-20

Rodney Stollings continued to grow into one of the greatest hitters the game of base ball had ever seen. After spending much of the season in .440 range, he cooled down to a league leading .421. Norman Lent recovered from an off season (.347 in 1877) to finish 3rd at .392. Stollings also lead with 68 Long Hits, 24 more than teammate Panell and Flake who split time with Buffalo and Chicago; and missed by 1 setting a league record for hits with 158—teammate Panell had 159. Stollings set the record for doubles, again, with 48 and tied his home run record at 12.

The top four run scorers were Brooklynites: Calvin Wing and Panell tied at 89, with Stollings (74) and Silky Goodstein (68) next in line. Wing also took 42 extra bases, a full 14 ahead of Steve Alves of Chicago. The runs and extra bases where league records, as was Wing’s 65 walks.

Evertt Waugh of Brooklyn allowed only 2.11 Responsible runs to pace the circuit; while Cherokee Kinan topped with 18 victories. Kinan’s 50 batters struck was also a league leader and Boris Seekell’s 226.1 Innings pitched lead the Empire.

The difference in the league was offense. Brooklyn scored 581 runs; at 440 Boston was second in the league. Walks, hits, steals, and extra base hits—the Atlantics dominated every facet of the line.
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Old 05-31-2005, 09:45 AM   #104
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1878-1879 Off Season: Prelude to War

From the Cincinnati Bugle
Kings Leave Empire!
Von Schriber Casts Lot With Temple


Citing the ever increasing salaries dictated by President James McCormick, Max Von Schriber has pulled the Base Ball Kings out of the Empire League and into a new national circuit formed by the famed William Temple. “McCormick has continually raised the salaries of the players to the disregard of profit. Under such an arraignment, only the Brooklyns and Chicagos have a legitimate chance to win. William Temple has a far more equitable proposal allowing even the smallest of Cities a chance to win.”

Von Schriber, who had vowed to sell the club if they did not win the title, feels the base ball mad of Cincinnati will embrace the new arraignment. “The only noticeable change will be the clubs we play,” Von Schriber stated.

The new circuit holds the line of salaries, which has increased to $1,500 in the Empire. As of now, seven cities will be represented in the loop: Manhattan, Providence, Buffalo, Baltimore, Saint Louis, Louisville and Cincinnati. “These are some of the most fevered cities when it comes to this grand game,” Von Schriber notes. “McCormick has taken the game to where the most profit is to be made, not to where the best fans are,” citing the slighting of Louisville by the Empire.
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Old 05-31-2005, 11:48 AM   #105
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Interesting...a team did switch and there will be a market battle, but it'll be in Buffalo (again). Are you intending to have both leagues co-exist indefinitely (letting history take a life of its own outside of the original history this world is based on), or will one have to fold as it will have to be the American Association of this world, which tried and failed to compete with the NL?
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Old 05-31-2005, 12:01 PM   #106
SelzShoes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfpack
Interesting...a team did switch and there will be a market battle, but it'll be in Buffalo (again). Are you intending to have both leagues co-exist indefinitely (letting history take a life of its own outside of the original history this world is based on), or will one have to fold as it will have to be the American Association of this world, which tried and failed to compete with the NL?
Temple's league still has one team to add. So all the battle lines are not yet drawn. As for the rest, I don't want to reveal all yet.

P.S. I work for an Indy League Team's booster club (The Gateway Grizzlies of the Frontier League) so updates for the next 3 months are based more on thier schedule than mine.

Last edited by SelzShoes : 05-31-2005 at 12:09 PM.
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Old 05-31-2005, 05:59 PM   #107
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1878-1879 Off Season: Prelude to War

“William Temple is a cur of the first order.”

It was not the fact a rival league was forming, James McCormick had long accepted the fact of this eventuality. But Temple was playing, in the common parlance, dirty pool. While the EL had envisioned Indianapolis and Detroit as way stations until park leases became available in St. Louis and Louisville, Temple snuck in and filled those cities with his own clubs. “By God, as long as I am alive, there will never be an EL team in those cities!” Even worse, in his own beloved Chicago, Temple had placed a club on the south side, among the ethnic workingmen he allegedly despised.

While aides comforted the now florid faced mogul with the reasoning the 50¢ admittance fee would keep attendance down; McCormick saw the math in a different light. Paying fare to and from the west side with a 25¢ admission was just the same as a straight fifty. Would the gentleman fan ‘go south’ too, with the promise of no liquor to agitate the lower classes? Perhaps, and that was the largest worry. If the moneyed class was willing to travel, who would come to see the Browns? Crowds could be ‘rowdy’ at Empire parks, especially late in games as the beer and brown liquors flowed.

And Buffalo. The club barely survived a challenge from a regional league, what hope did they have against a well funded league hell bent on breaking the Empire.

And Cincinnati, that Bavarian traitor looking at the bottom line more than winning—what type of fool was he. “No faith in any man any more,” McCormick muttered.

“Perhaps you should sit, sir,” a lackey calmly inquired.

“And perhaps you should watch tens of thousands of dollars evaporate!”

McCormick massaged his head. “By God, if that bastard wants war, then he shall have it in spades.” His brow furrowed, "find a suitable yard in Manhattan--I'll own the damn team myself if I have to."
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Old 06-01-2005, 11:25 AM   #108
SelzShoes
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1878-1879 Off Season: Dissent in the Ranks

Letter from Thaddeus Hamilton to James McCormick

Mr. McCormick
While I have shown unfettered faith in your leadership lo these many years, I must object in the strongest of terms possible to your most recent decisions as league President.

Placing a club in Manhattan to spite Temple may make sense in your personal battle with him, but I feel could do damage to my club. We have, with our success of the past two seasons, established ourselves as the pre eminent club in the New York area. The action you take exacerbates the decline in attendance one Manhattan club would cause. I feel our league would be better served by placing Cincinnati’s replacement in a city Temple’s organization shows a weakness: Louisville or Saint Louis for example. The New York papers will not take kindly to an outsider, such as you, attempting to undo the efforts of one of their favored. Brooklyn is strong enough to win the attention and adulation of the sport fan of the city.

You have ordered clubs to release players with, as you phrased it, “ties to the gambler and number men.” While my club felt the brunt of this relationship not two seasons ago, you have included my fine keystoner Panell on this list. He may have been implicated in wrongdoing whilst in Phila, but has been a model citizen in Brooklyn. This action runs counter to your decree to keep the stars in the Empire. Panell will surely latch on with Temple’s Manhattans, as he does have an eye for talent and give further legitimacy to his organization.

And finally, just weeks after declaring a salary limit of $1,500.00—you declare a ceiling of $2,000.00! Temple’s organization is only paying $900.00; do you really think the additional monies are necessary to keep our stars?

My faith in you has limits, if you succeed of course, all will be forgiven. While you have predicted this challenge for years, I fear you have not prepared to fight a proper battle. I needen’t remind you your term as President expires next season. If this season goes poorly, I do not think I shall have trouble finding the votes needed to replace you in this post.

Respectfully,
Thaddeus Hamilton

Last edited by SelzShoes : 06-01-2005 at 05:44 PM.
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Old 06-02-2005, 12:51 PM   #109
SelzShoes
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1878-1879 Off Season: Richardson's Reply

Letter from Frank Richardson to William Temple
Mr. Temple

While I enjoyed my time in New York, and am flattered you would consider me to be the crown jewel in your new league, I must respectfully decline your offer of a contract.

In the past 3 seasons, I have played in Manhattan, Cincinnati and Philadelphia. The thought of moving, yet again, does not appeal to me. I feel I have found a home in Philadelphia. We have a core of ballplayers who over a half a season, played better than any club I have ever been associated with; including our 1874 champions. Being so close to another title appeals to me, and this is a city looking for an identity outside of the shadow of New York. I feel they will honor a champion like no other.

More importantly—the quality of the players you have contracted do not appeal to me. I want to play against the best this game has to offer, and to date, the best still play in the Empire. There are men who show promise, if the sporting pages are to be believed, but no one of the standard of Stollings or myself. The quality players you do seem to sign have the stench of gambler’s money about them. I purged my club of such ruffians, and will not play in a league that allows Zoellener and Bronneke back into the game. Heed this warning Mr. Temple, just because someone is a good ballplayer does not make him a good man.

I honestly hope your endeavor succeeds. Another league of national stature is good for the condition of the players and of the game itself.

Sincerely,
Frank Richardson
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Old 06-02-2005, 05:56 PM   #110
SelzShoes
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1878-1879 Off Season: Lines are Drawn

Letter from James McCormick to A. J. Helmuth
Mr. Helmuth,
It has been some time since I had reason to contact you; but the recent defection of the Base Ball Kings—which you founded—to the Columbia Association compels me to write.

Since the famous tour of 1869, the Base Ball Kings have been rightfully hailed as the greatest team ever assembled. But Max Von Schriber has degraded this proud heritage to a foul joke. Upon winning the Empire title only two years ago, he has rid the team of its key performers; focusing solely on the profit line and not victory. Now he has moved this formerly crack club to be affiliated with a league not manned by the best talent the nation has to offer, but stocked with stumblebums and muffins of the worst kind. These are men suited for local and regional nines, not a once proud name such as the Base Ball Kings.

If the legacy of the Base Ball Kings means anything to you, there is action you can take. As you own the grounds this club plays, you can choose to revoke the lease he has. While this will not completely put an end to his plan to further degrade the legacy, it is a sound beginning.

Secondly, in a city as base ball mad as Cincinnati, there needs to be a club with investors willing to place a quality nine on the field. If you act to sever the lease of Von Schriber, I propose allowing you to charter a new Base Ball Kings for the City of Cincinnati. I shall give you my own personal assurance of financial solvency for the first season.

Please respond quickly, so the necessary papers may be drawn.

Yours,
James McCormick
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Old 06-02-2005, 06:05 PM   #111
fantastic flying froggies
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this means War!
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Old 06-03-2005, 09:44 AM   #112
SelzShoes
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1878-1879 Off Season: Changes

Since there has been a lot of upheaval, movement and expansion a run down of who is in what league is probably in order:

Code:
Empire League Columbia Association Boston Baltimore Brooklyn Buffalo Buffalo Chicago Chicago Cincinnati (EL) Cincinnati (new)Louisville Columbus (new) Manhattan Detroit Providence Indianapolis Saint Louis New York (new) Philadelphia

The leagues are head to head in four cities (Buffalo, Cincinnati, New York/Manhattan and Chicago).
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Old 06-03-2005, 11:12 AM   #113
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Fight! Fight! Fight!
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Old 06-03-2005, 02:46 PM   #114
fantastic flying froggies
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Could you give us the team names as well? Especially for the new teams...
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Old 06-03-2005, 04:15 PM   #115
SelzShoes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fantastic flying froggies
Could you give us the team names as well? Especially for the new teams...
Code:
Boston Unions Baltimore Clippers Brooklyn Atlantics Buffalo Hornblowers/Buglers Buffalo Eires Chicago Southsiders Chicago Browns/Westies Cincinnati Kings/Columbias Cincinnati Kings/Empires Louisville Colonels/Keels Columbus Senators Manhattan Gents Detroit Fleur de Lis Providence Rhodies/Reds Indianapolis Indys Saint Louis Cobblers/Hops New York Empires Philadelphia Quakers/Crimsons

With nicknames not formalized until the early part of the 20th century, teams sometimes were known by more than one name, and the origins were sometimes of the most humble of reasons. In fact, many players, officials and newsmen referred to the clubs using just the city with the plural "s". The emergence of the Columbia Association gave rise to a need for greater distinction among the clubs.

The Boston and Brooklyn clubs grew out of gentlemen's clubs out of the 1850's and 60's. Boston took their name from the "Union of the Sons of Kearney" and Brooklyn from the "Atlantic Athletic Club."

The Chicago Browns and Detroit Fleur de Lis so referred to by distinctive uniform details. The Chicagos noted for heavy brown piping and stockings, the Detroits for the distinctive symbol over the breast, celebrating the owner's French heritage. Although with the Chicagos, they were also referred to by location during this period of two teams.

The CA's Buffalo entry was owned by Winfred Siemens who owned the Buffalo Bugle newspaper, and the nicknames attached reflected this.

Saint Louis's team names reflected the two main industries of the city.

During Frank Richardson's time in Philadelphia, the newspapers starter referring more to the color of the trim and caps of the club, rather than the peaceful intonations of "Quakers," as the style of play championed by Richardson was seldom peaceful on the opposition.

Both Cincinnati clubs lay claim to the heritage of the touring Base Ball Kings of 1869. Referring to the city and league (as with the New York Empire League entry) was a way of distinguishing the two.
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Old 06-03-2005, 04:38 PM   #116
fantastic flying froggies
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Excellent! Thanks.
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Old 06-03-2005, 05:04 PM   #117
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Considering the hostility, I'm pretty sure just one league will survive. I can hardly picture McCormick or Temple being gracious enough in victory to actually let any of the folded league's teams merge with the surviving league. The enmity of course also precludes any chance at a "World Series" which, since the real world didn't have one until 1901, fits right in here.

I must say I really do enjoy this thread. I'm not a great baseball fan or really steeped in its history aside from the major landmark players and teams, but all this is quite fascinating stuff.
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Old 06-07-2005, 10:31 AM   #118
SelzShoes
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1878-1879 Off Season: The Crank Speaks

From hand bills posted around Cincinnati
Proclamation by Royal Council, the Base Ball King Boosters

WHEREAS, Max Von Schreiber, has chosen to move our Base Ball Kings to the Columbia Association;

WHEREAS, AJ Helmuth, has taken it upon himself to restore the glory to Cincinnati Base Ball in the Empire League;

IT IS HEREBY RESOLVED, that the traditions of the Cincinnati Base Ball Kings are better represented by the Empire League club and not Max Von Schreiber.

AND FURTHER, that the true fan of the GRAND AMERICAN GAME will continue to attend games at the Avenue Grounds, and cheer the True Base Ball Kings to glory.
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Old 06-07-2005, 12:19 PM   #119
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1878-1879 Off Season: Lifelines

From the Chicago Eagle
President McCormick has sent an invitation to Presidents and Commissioners of all League “East of the Rockies” to join him at the opening day festivities for Chicago. But this meeting is not to be all pomp and circumstance, McCormick, shrewd business man he is, has a purpose to the play.

These local associations have been the starting point for many players now hailed as ‘stars’ in the Empire League. While the practice has been for Empire League clubs to sign a player with little consideration for the impact it may have on his current team; McCormick seeks to change this. President McCormick proposes two major changes between the relationship between these leagues and the Empire.

First, the Empire would respect the contracts of these lesser leagues; no longer being able to swoop in and seize the best players as so much plunder. In return, the locals would recognize and uphold any suspension and expulsions levied by the Empire. The disgraced Zoellener and Bronneke from the Brooklyn squad of two years ago continued to play in two of these regional leagues. If this agreement had been in place, they would have been forced to find employment more suited to their criminal temperament. Such a stance would help cleanse the game from the riff-raff with whom the Empire has been too commonly associated.

More ambitious is the proposal to have set prices for what players at these lower leagues can be purchased. “The steady influx of new talent is imperative if the Empire is to remain the premier organization for base ball in this county,” McCormick related to us. “Rather than have our clubs get bogged down in negotiations for each and every player under contract, I would rather assure the regional top price for their top talent.”

It is the hope of Empire League officials an arrangement of this nature will keep the rival Columbia Association from being able to adequately stock their rosters.
--------
Of the 22 leagues contacted, 12 accepted the invitation of McCormick to opening day. When only two expressed interest in the proposed arrangement, McCormick did not pursue the proposal further. Many of the leagues felt with the Columbia Association around, they could force a bidding war for their top talent, and refused to lock themselves into an agreement that would seem to benefit the Empire more.
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Old 06-07-2005, 02:58 PM   #120
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1879--WAR!: False Beginnings

Excerpt from “The History of Professional Base Ball” (1941)
When the Columbia Association was formed in 1879, it began what old timers refer to as “the first base ball war.” The fan of the time would have thought it to be a short war, as the CA was beset with problems.

Saint Louis and Louisville were in full revolt early on, chaffing under the edict banning alcohol sales at the games. “If the St. Louisan can not have his bucket of beer, he has no reason to go a game,” owner Johan Hansferd pleaded with Temple’s hand picked commission. When the commission upheld the ban, they sold beer and whisky anyway. When the commission fined Hansferd (and Louisville and Cincinnati) the clubs refused to pay. Hansferd threaten to either form another league or join the Empire, the commission revoked the fines; a move that allowed the remainder of the owners to violate the league charter any way they saw fit.

The three men, all prominent members of the New York sporting community and personal friends of William Temple, did not carry much respect with the other owners. Clubs cut admission, paid players beyond the set salary, and generally carried on business in a manner befitting the pre-Empire association days. By mid-season, all but one of the commissioners had resigned his position.

The lack of authority further plunged the CA into chaos. Teams withheld visitor shares and openly attempted to woo players from other CA clubs to jump contract. Temple, who even in the collapse of order continued to obey the league charter, realized in his zeal to topple the Empire he had made serious lapses in the quality of owner allowed to join.

Making matter worse talent the CA did lure from the Empire were those with a taint of gambling. Rumors of fixed games ran rampant, and the various clubs showed no interest in cleaning up the game as McCormick’s owners had. To the disgust of the genteel William Temple, the CA was a worse situation than he had experienced in the Empire. And it was all on his head.

The Empire, under the firm hand of James McCormick, kept their owners in line. In three of the four cities the leagues were directly competing, a friendly press further underminded the CA’s efforts to build a league. It appeared the Empire would vanquish it’s first rival in less than a season, but fate had other plans.
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Old 06-09-2005, 11:03 AM   #121
SelzShoes
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1879--WAR!: The Hand of Fate

From the Chicago Eagle
JAMES MCCORMICK DEAD
Stockyard Baron, Base Ball Official Dies in Sleep
Family Holdings Near Millions

James McCormick, eldest son of one of Chicago’s first nationally known families, passed away in his sleep it was reveled. McCormick, who parlayed his family’s holdings in real estate into control of the southside stockyards and hog rendering facilities was not suspected to be in ill health.

McCormick, who was known for his involvement with the Empire Base Ball League, had been acclaimed nationally for his crusade to make the sport honest. Under his direction, gamblers and their hires had been chased from league grounds.

He is survived by his wife, Felicity, their six children and four brothers.
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Old 06-09-2005, 11:18 AM   #122
Wolfpack
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Hmm...nasty estate fight brewing, perhaps? Hints about fate having other plans also seem to indicate the EL will not be able to stamp out the CL as McCormick hoped, or at least as quickly, anyway....
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Old 06-09-2005, 01:43 PM   #123
fantastic flying froggies
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(...fff wonders if there are any hints of foul play???...)
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Old 06-09-2005, 02:18 PM   #124
SelzShoes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fantastic flying froggies
(...fff wonders if there are any hints of foul play???...)
Sadly no, just a massive heart attack in his sleep. A murder mystery would be way beyond my skills at this point.
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Old 06-15-2005, 11:49 AM   #125
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1879--WAR!: Burying the Living

Empire League Owners’ Meeting
“But as his brother I have every right to succeed him,” the decorum and tact of the funeral had now been replaced with much shouting and banging on the table.

“Please, the only contribution you have made to this League is second every motion proposed by your brother. Besides, we need continuity in Chicago to put that club on the south side out of business.”

“Mr. Hamilton, are you sure you will not take the position.”

“What, so we can go through this again in six months,” snorted Bertrham Farley of Buffalo.

“You sir are a cur of the worst kind,” Adams rose from his chair, grasping Thaddeus’s cane. “I shall teach you some manners.”

“And I shall teach you your place,” spat Farley. It became harder and harder to hear over the din. Hamilton raised his hands and demanded silence. He grudgingly was granted it.
“It seems those we would trust with the position of President among us have reasons not to take it.”

“What about Helmuth? I know Cincinnati is a battleground, but the fans are flocking to his club and not Von Schriber’s it should not be that hard to hold serve there,” Hartpence of Boston suggested.

The eyes of the room turned towards the aged man who begun the craze for professional ball. “Well Helmuth, what about it?”

“Well,” the old man stammered, “would I be allowed to keep the deal I had with McCormick?”

“What deal you had with McCormick,” Farley slowly asked.

“The only way I could afford to field a club was if he paid my expenses the first year, and so . . .”

Jasper Hallowell of Columbus leapt to his feet, “Why was I not offered that deal? I am losing money hand over fist and we give paper away to this doddering fool?”

“And I too could use the subsidies,” shouted Mike Mongan of Indianapolis. “Who decided this bull----?”

“Now we could not lose Cincinnati,” Hartpence began.

“But you can lose Columbus? Is that what I am hearing?”

“No, he didn’t mean that at all.”

”Why should we take interest in a league that cares not for us,” Mongan asked feverishly.
Hamilton slammed his cane on the table for attention. Uneasy quiet returned.
“Cincinnati is the home of a traitor. We needed to teach a lesson to Von Schriber. Unfortunately, you do not have someone taking our business away in your cities. Farley is struggling with the Association club in his town, but has the income to fight without any help. As does McCormick, or Mr. Hyde of New York. Helmuth has the respect of the city of Cincinnati and if it took some silver to get him in place, then so be it.”

“I still do not like the arrangement,” Mongan said.

“Nor I,” seconded Hallowell.

“May I suggest something,” Hubert Crawley of Detroit meekly offered.

“Please do.”

“What about Temple?”

”What about him?”

“Why not him as President?” The room erupted into laughter. “But he is unhappy with the Association, and having him would surely end their hold on New York.”

“I think he is on the right track, but the wrong person,” Hyde of New York said excitedly.

“Two of his commissioners have resigned; we could pinch one of them. Temple brags about the ideal of the Association; it would play very well to have one of them on our side.”

“You may be on to something, yes,” Obie McCormick stroked his beard approvingly.

“By God, this could be a masterstroke—Adams, send wires to the two gentlemen who resigned from Temple’s commission, one of them should take the job.”

“Since they will be in New York, I suggest Hamilton, Hartpence, Hyde and I conduct the interviews and be given authority to hire the proper man,” Franklin suggested.

“Bah, more Eastern influence, just what we need,” Hallowell hissed.
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Old 06-15-2005, 04:00 PM   #126
SelzShoes
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1879--WAR!: Winds of Change

Letter from Jasper Hallowell to William Temple
Mr. Temple,

After careful consideration of your offer to join the Columbia Association, both I and Mr. Mongan of Indianapolis will accept. We will keep our decision silent until the beginning of the next championship season. Until then, we shall continue to keep you informed of events in the League meetings.

The search for a President is becoming farcical, as no candidate can be agreed upon. Those involved in the sport outside the two associations wish to remain neutral and no internal nominee have any support from the required five.

Even more positive, the situations in Buffalo and Cincinnati seem to be turning in the Association’s favor. Helmuth is eager to step aside as the cost of continuing with his own monies looks to be prohibitive. And the lowered costs of operation favors Winfred Siemens over the long-term—encourage him to keep the park open at all cost.

I look forward to the next summer, when we can rid our sport of the plague of the Empire.

Respectfully,
Jasper Hallowell
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Old 06-21-2005, 09:39 AM   #127
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Sorry for the lack of updates, but I’ve been out of the ‘dynasty’ mood for awhile. Short version: I had been a regular at the OOTP boards, but the Mods there have allowed a group of members, almost all from the OT forum, to harass and attack other members of the board with absolutely no action against them. I’ve been expressing my displeasure with this policy, and the Mods have ignored my complaints—even a “we do not think this behavior is inappropriate” would have been nice. I know it is an unpaid position, but the attitude of the Mods there seems to be, it is just easier for those fed up with the lack of civility to leave than to actually enforce the rules.

Anyway, I have put this aside for a time, but am missing my fictional friends and will be jumping back into this in the next couple of days.
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Old 06-21-2005, 02:12 PM   #128
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1879--WAR!: The Path Remains Crooked

He stood in the box, the air still crisp with dew. Elmo smiled to himself and looked for the signal. As the umpire bellowed “play ball,” a flash of light—a mirror reflecting the sun—shone. The fix was on.

It was a complicated system, based on precise timing. Based on how much the syndicate had paid out or taken in, when Elmo Bronneke was slated to pitch, the bosses decided if they need him to win or lose. A wire was sent from the central office in downtown to an inconspicuous storefront near the park. From the store, one of two carrier pigeons was released: black for play clean, white to throw the game. When the pigeon arrived at a home near the park, a young boy would rush to his ‘uncle’ with a plain envelope with a single slip of paper inside. Based on the coded instructions, the man would know whether to ‘flash’ Bronneke or not with the mirrored back of his pocket watch. The whole process took under 15 minutes.

Bronneke was the only member of the Brooklyn triad still playing ball. Mosholder had retired after the 1877 season, and now worked with the New York gambling syndicate in what he referred to as their ‘collections’ department. Bennie Zoellner, the first baseman on the squad, had played a season for Bangor in the New England Association, but when it became clear the Empire would not reinstate him for 1878, he left the club. A tryout for the Columbia Association had not gone well, as he had put on too much weight to move with the speed the game demanded in this era.

But Bronneke had survived. An arm injury in 1878 while with Omaha of the Flatlands Congress had been seen as an example of the consequences of an unjust life. Forced to make a salary outside of baseball, Bronneke traveled south and found work on a ranch in Texas. There, the daily rigors of work built his arm back into shape. While letters to James McCormick went unanswered, the news of the formation of the Columbia Association gave him hope of pitching on the national stage again. A letter of contrition to William Temple was enough to ‘prove’ the young hurler had been ‘framed’ by McCormick and his cabal. It was not long, however, before Bronneke decided the lower salary of the Association require supplementing.

While the Empire had taken steps to clear the gambling element out of their league, the Association had not. Trying to build a following with young unknowns proved to be difficult. “Name” players, even ones with questionable past, were seen as necessary to provide legitimacy to the new league.
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Old 06-21-2005, 03:13 PM   #129
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Glad to see you're back, Selz.

I must say I'd missed your oldtimers as well...
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Old 07-03-2005, 02:09 PM   #130
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1879--WAR!: Remains of the Summer

Any attention the Columbia Association wanted was stolen by the one of the best multiple team races in Empire League history. With the Chicago Southsiders holding an substantial lead until the very last weeks, there was little drama to be had. But the Empire had solid 3 to 4 team race all summer.

Boston, Chicago and Brooklyn all hovered within 3 games of each other for the first month. Boston had not been a factor in the race since 1875, while the Browns and Atlantics were big spenders becoming perennial contenders. While Eastern writers were quick to declare yet another Brooklyn title, they soon would learn it was the effort of superstars, not the team factoring in the Atlantic’s domination. In his fifth start of the year, Marquis Nicolet, the pitching star of the championships, suffered a severe arm injury and missed the rest of the year. Without Nicolet’s superior skills, the Atlantics started to slip. The season was over when Rodney Stollings missed a slate of games with a bad hip. Although Stollings would return and have a dominating season, although not at the level he was accustomed, the Brooklyns sunk out of contention and into a 7th place finish.

With Brooklyn falling out, Detroit climbed into the fray. While the pitching of the Detroits was never very good all season, they did field one of the most consistent offenses of any Empire club. By mid-July they had surged into trading first with Boston, with the Browns hovering a couple games back.

At the same time, Horacio Pfahlert in Buffalo was single handedly leading the Eries into the race. In 1877 and 1878, Pfahlert had thrown 196 innings with 12 wins to show for his effort. In 1879, the Charmer won 19 and pitched 224 innings. At 35, one of the best-known players of the early years of the League had put together his best season. But the Eries could not find the complementary piece to go with such a dominant hurler and faded to 4th, and a respectable 6 games behind.

While Detroit’s pitching finally gave way, it was left to Boston and Chicago to battle for the title. It was amazing that the Browns could hang so close to the Unions. Boston scored runs at will, especially at home where they compiled a .700 winning percentage. The everyday line up sported seven .300 hitters, and one .290 hitter. It was the philosophy of the old days—single after single after single. But the defensive effort was one of the worst in either league and undermined the hurling and hitting.

Chicago was moving in a new direction: speed. Aubrey Fairie, finally a starter, and Steve Alves sparked one of the least powerful line-ups in the Empire, taking every extra base offered to them. The two ended with a combined 64 steals. With Weisenburger on his way to another batting title, the Browns would push home just enough runs to win. But try as they might, the Browns could never take the lead. They tied the Unions several times, but just could not win that extra game to put them in the lead. Like two years before, the season came down to the last game of the season.

Boston held a one game lead, and needed to beat Indianapolis, a great pitching club with even worse defense than the Unions. Alfred Moulton, the only pitcher to rival Pfahlert as an individual took to the box. The Indys played their usually sloppy game and committed three errors. Moulton would win his 19th game, and render the Browns victory over Detroit meaningless. Boston had secured their 5th title, while Chicago was developing a reputation as a club that could “contend but not win.”

Code:
Empire League Standings Team W L PCT GB Home Away XInn 1Run Boston 61 39 .610 - 35-15 26-24 2-5 11-20 Chicago 60 40 .600 1.0 27-23 33-17 3-3 14- 9 Detroit 56 44 .560 5.0 28-22 28-22 4-5 18-11 Buffalo 55 45 .550 6.0 33-17 22-28 4-1 20-12 Indianapolis 53 47 .530 8.0 27-23 26-24 3-2 10-17 Philadelphia 51 49 .510 10.0 28-22 23-27 3-7 14-17 Brooklyn 49 51 .490 12.0 27-23 22-28 2-3 11-17 Cincinnati 47 53 .470 14.0 28-22 19-31 8-3 16-17 Columbus 35 65 .350 26.0 23-27 12-38 6-2 21-13 New York 33 67 .330 28.0 19-31 14-36 1-5 13-15 Columbia Association Standings Team W L PCT GB Home Away XInn 1Run Chicago 60 40 .600 - 23-27 37-13 3- 2 9-10 Buffalo 58 42 .580 2.0 31-19 27-23 6- 3 18-10 Cincinnati 51 49 .510 9.0 22-28 29-21 6- 4 12-15 Louisville 50 50 .500 10.0 24-26 26-24 6- 7 16-18 Providence 50 50 .500 10.0 23-27 27-23 7- 7 19-18 New York 47 53 .470 13.0 20-30 27-23 7- 4 12- 9 Baltimore 46 54 .460 14.0 23-27 23-27 3-11 20-20 Saint Louis 38 62 .380 22.0 16-34 22-28 5- 5 12-18
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Old 07-05-2005, 05:43 PM   #131
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1879-1880 Offseason

From “True Sport: William Temple and the Columbia Association (1987)”

The defection of Indianapolis and Columbus could not have come at a better time for Temple. Reciepts from the four cities the two circuits were head to head showed an economic disaster. Chicago, while winning the Columbia pennant, drew one quarter of the Browns attendance; Buffalo was unable to attract 1,000 per game; and in Cincinnati the Association underestimated the hostility towards Helmuth for dismantling the champion Kings of 1876. Even in New York, Temple’s base of power, his Gents, as the press dubbed them, drew equally with the Empire’s last place New York entry. In truth, only Saint Louis and Louisville showed any signs of turning a profit. The combination of high admission and low quality play turned off the ‘true lover of ball’ Temple planned on being the core audience for his league. Instead, these fans turned to regional and city leagues, where the admission fit the level of play. The choice for Temple was to stick with his ideals and watch the Association crumble; or reorder his priorities and truly rival the Empire. Temple would choose the latter and begin to craft a thoughly modern league.

Legitimacy as the superior league belonged to the Empire because of the national reputation of its players. Even a player like Aubrey Fairie, whose reputation was far greater than his production, was known by the casual fan. Rodney Stollings, Norman Lent and Horacio Pfahlet all had made their name before the Empire existed. And Cappy Richardson was the unquestioned brightest star of them all. To the followers of the game, the Columbia Association rosters were full of too many players like Marshall Quisenberry, one of the best hitting first basemen of the 1880’s, but for the moment a raw kid. As for the ‘names’ that did jump, the stain of gambling was clear; like with the early days of the Empire, the integrity of the Association was openly questioned.

Legitmacy for the Empire also came from the League structure. Even with the death of James McCormick, and the failure of the League to name a President until the cusp of the 1880 season the Empire was viewed as stable and ‘honorable’. The mid-season resignation of two-thirds of the governing commission pushed the Association to the brink of anarchy. The blatent disregard for rules and contracts of the first season would haunt the Association as it attempted to establish itself. Temple truly believed in the ideals he founded the Association on, but realized there was a practical disadvantage to his ideals. Over the fall and winter of 1879 and 1880 William Temple would reshape the structure and direction of his beloved circuit.
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Old 07-06-2005, 04:50 PM   #132
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I'd forgotten you posted over here. I was worried the Prologue was gone forever. I'll be watching here for certain.
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Old 07-06-2005, 06:45 PM   #133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ifspuds
I'd forgotten you posted over here. I was worried the Prologue was gone forever. I'll be watching here for certain.

Hi, ifspuds!
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Old 07-08-2005, 05:59 PM   #134
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1879-1880 Offseason

“Mr. Adams, good to see you.”

William Frederick Adams was sick to his stomach to be away from Mr. Hamilton. The man he had served so loyally these many years now bed ridden and awaiting the final call of the reaper. Adams’ place was with the man whose family were the few loyal employees he could surround himself with, not downtown meeting with bank officials.

The office, once the den of Mr. Hamilton had undergone extensive redecorating in the months of his advanced illness. Any trace of its former occupant, aside from the obligatory portrait of the Bank President, had been erased. The office was rigid and austere, reflecting the soul of the current occupant.

Jonias Van Baar’s family was old money; coming over with the original Dutch settlers of New Amsterdam. The Panics of the late 1870’s had, humiliatingly, forced back to work to maintain the family fortune. Granted sitting on the board of directors of Brooklyn’s most prominent bank was not the worst of all possible worlds, but he was entitled to the life of leisure the Van Baar’s had become famous for. Still, his familial and social ties had made him a valued member of the Board of Directors in a very short time; so much so he was elevated to ‘Acting’ President’ over longer termed members, with the implicit understanding the ‘Acting’ would be removed after the inevitable occurred. Working was humiliating, but the opportunity to enhance the family name was worth the daily toil.

“I am not a man to waste time,” Van Baar began, “so I shall tell you straight on: We have decided your services are no longer necessary.”

“Pardon?” a sick chill filled Adams.

“As you are in the employ of Great Brooklyn Bank and Trust in the role of personal secretary to a man who, to be perfectly honest, has no earthly need for one; the Board of Directors has decided to eliminate your position. You may pick up your final pay envelope at the front desk. If you have any personal belongings at Mr. Hamilton’s, please have them removed within the next twenty-four hours or you shall be arrested for trespassing.”

“But . . .”

“There is nothing to discuss, we have made our decision.”

“Mr. Hamilton needs me.”

“Nonsense, he needs a nurse—and as we have one taking care of him already, there is nothing you can do for him except take his money by sitting around and doing nothing all day. Now please, leave the premises before I have you escorted out. We shall notify you by post when he passes so you may pay your respects then.”

Adams rose and begun to leave the office. Reaching the door, he turned, “What shall become of the Atlantics?”

Van Baar momentarily looked puzzled, “Oh the Based Ballers—the Board seems to feel it would be a sound investment to hold on to the squad. A way of connecting with the rabble and such—though I doubt they have enough money to concern us if they squander it on such frivolities. Why do you ask?”

“No reason.”
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Old 07-11-2005, 11:20 AM   #135
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1879-1880 Offseason

“You certainly can not suggest ballplayers have the right to organize?”

Young Kenneth Crow observed the shocked faces of gathered. His escort for the evening, the actress Madeline Dumas, gripped his hand tightly hoping to cause enough discomfort to silence the shining star of the box. The hurler stood firm, “I not only suggest it, but I insist on it.”

The tuxedoed gentlemen rumbled over their port and cigars, more than one was heard to quip “too much time with Weisenburger.” They had come to bask in the glow of Chicago’s finest pitcher, not be lectured in the finer points of socialist doctrine. The evening, for them, had been ruined.

“Organization is the sweeping the workers of America, why should ball player not be included?”

”Because, they are not workers,” Fletcher Stoddard forcefully intoned. He had seen his rail yards paralyzed several times by the influx of European Radicals. Men who sought not an honest day’s pay, but to agitate the hardest of his men into slothful dreams. Men who spend four or five months a year playing pitch and bat can not be considered workers. They are, for the most part, itinerant laborers who the Creator has blessed with strong arms and swift legs.”

“Well, I must object to that characterization with some force dear sir,” Crow said with a tension relieving chuckle. “I hope to begin law school within a year hence, and want to change the prevailing view of my mates.”

“From exploited to exploiter—the natural progression for the radical,” a wine soaked voice bellowed to the merriment of all.

“Dear heart, tell them about the trip Mr. McCormick is planning for the coming fall,” Madeline was uncomfortable speaking of such politics to an audience as clearly adverse to such notions as unions and higher pay scales.

“I hope to use my skills as a solicitor; if they be as grand as those I exhibit on the field, to form a brotherhood for the players. A collective to warrant some protections.”
“And what could you possibly require protection from?” Stoddard queried. “A ball game is not required for everyday life. I can go to watch the park leagues or even a gathering of children—I do not have to go to Lake Front Park for my amusement.”

“But you do go, since you desire the best ball playing for your amusement?” The gathered nodded. “We make tremendous profits for the owners of these clubs and receive very little back in terms of wages. The famed Nicolet of Brooklyn was summarily released because of an arm injury after hurling the Atlantics to two pennants; if he is able to find employ this upcoming season it will be at a greatly reduced wage . . .”

“As it would be in any industry! When you are no longer able to do the job you are paid for, the owner should have the right to release you. It is sound business principle. I do not operate my rail yards for men to mill about and receive monies for nothing. I expect a hard day’s work for an honest wage. The hardest working men receive more; the slothful and incompetent are released. This is the nature of the business.”

“I fear that is an unjust system; since the hardest working barely receive a living wage as it is. Higher wages for all would . . .”

“Would damn this country to the upheaval and strife scurrying across Europe! Why should I guarantee a good wage to someone who will not work hard? Why should there be no incentive to reach for?”

“There should be incentive; but the tendency is not to reward workers, but to punish them with unnatural ceilings on wages. That is what we have in the Empire. No matter how well I perform, I can earn no more than $2,000.00 in a season. Shouldn’t I or Frank Richardson be able to earn more if we are producing better than our fellows?”

“If you ask me, $2,000.00 is far too much to play a game.”

“Then we shall continue to disagree.”
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Old 07-11-2005, 03:14 PM   #136
fantastic flying froggies
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Viva la Revolucion!

(Selz, I really love your dynasty...)
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Old 07-12-2005, 03:01 PM   #137
SelzShoes
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1879-1880 Offseason

The sun glowed crimson over the Nebraska plains as a solitary buggy moved steadily across the budding plains. The long trip to Kansas City was well on its way giving Marshall Quisenberry and his father time to reflect. A year ago his father was dead set against the trip to Baltimore to play ball. “Too risky,” he had warned his son, “they’ll use you and not pay, I fear.” A summer later and now he was talking about using the money to buy adjoining land and being able to look forward to not owing the bank “everything we will ever have.”

The slow trot continued over the hours, in time Marshall will be moving east in a Pullman sleeper; through cutting through half a country to Baltimore. All the boys on the club were rough hewn—farm boys, factory workers, miner’s sons all taking a chance to escape a life of gnarled hands and broken muscles. “When you spend your life sweating blood,” his father would say to him, “you never think anything better will come along.” There was still hard work in the fall and winter, but the weight of the world was breaking above them.

“You’ll try to make it to Saint Louis in July.”

His father nodded. “It’ll be hard, but with the extra money they are saying they’ll pay, I think your mother and I can do it.” The contract Baltimore offered raised Marshall’s salary from $900 to $1500 for the upcoming season, as the Columbia Association feared losing its few stars to the Empire. “Never thought a man could make so much money playing a game.”

“It’s just like those actors who come through with the Chautauqua, they make just as much or even more.”

“Yes, but people will pay to watch those plays and such—have been for a long long time. But how long have people been paying to watch ball games, and I’m not talking about the odd nickel here or there for those traveling clubs,” his father’s eyes looked off at the horizon. “Need to take it while you have the chance I suppose.” Quiet settled in over the buggy again.
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Old 07-12-2005, 08:01 PM   #138
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They fired Thaddeus's secretary?!

I don't suppose he managed to have any heirs before he got sick?
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Old 07-19-2005, 12:17 PM   #139
SelzShoes
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From “True Sport: William Temple and the Columbia Association” (1987)
Unfortunately, records of the 1880 owner’s meetings do not exist; but what is clear the direction of the Association had shifted. Saint Louis and Louisville, two of the most rebellious franchises were now in the hands of cousins of Temple.

”I can do with my franchise what I see fit.”
“Not if it violates the League Charter, which you signed.”
“Then enforce your damn charter, see where simple words gets you—you New York dunderpate.”
“Michael, get me my cheque book—I’ll buy the lot of you out.”
“You sir are daft.”
”How much—How much do you require to leave my sight for good?”
“I’ll take $7,000.”
“And you, Jackson, how much to get rid of the likes of you as well.”
“The same.”
”Good, now neither of you need come back. And the rest of you who think you are above the rules; step right up so I can wash my hands of your filthy devious ways.”


Temple understood for the Association to supplant the Empire as the preeminent baseball league in America, bold steps were needed.

”But that is why I left the Empire, I can not afford such salaries.”
“The public views us as a glorified regional league; we must buy the best talent from the Empire.”
“Still, $2,500 for a ballplayer—is that realistic?”


Even more than the bidding war he encouraged his fellow owners to engage in, the most radical idea was yet to come.

”I still don’t understand how owning these smaller clubs helps us.”
”If we own the regional teams, we can funnel the best players to our clubs—the Empire will wither and die for lack of talent.”
“Seems very risky to invest that much money just to try and drive someone out of business.”
“Vertical intergration—it is all the rage in industry; why can it not work for us.”
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Old 07-19-2005, 01:30 PM   #140
Wolfpack
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Sounds like the formation of the minor leagues is underway....
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Old 07-19-2005, 04:43 PM   #141
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfpack
Sounds like the formation of the minor leagues is underway....

...yup...
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Old 07-20-2005, 10:27 AM   #142
SelzShoes
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Just a note

Wife bought me OOTP6.5 (against my wishes) and we are also going out of town this weekend--there will not be any updates until probably next weekend.

I'm not sure yet if I will transfer Prequel to 6.5, I'm setting up my usual insanely micro-managed type league I normally do (this dynasty is a radical departure from what I normally do) to see how it handles. At the very least, I think I will transfer this to 6.5 when I get to 1946 (sometime next year at the pace I am going now).
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Old 07-21-2005, 04:22 PM   #143
fantastic flying froggies
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Happy birthday SelzShoes!
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Old 07-27-2005, 11:43 AM   #144
SelzShoes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fantastic flying froggies
Happy birthday SelzShoes!
Thank you FFF.

I've been tinkering with my 6.5 league alot (lets just say I forgot how detail focused I can be with these things--two weeks and I'm still just setting depth charts and line ups. ) Anyhoo--For the next month I'm going to be spending a whole lot of time with the Gateway Grizzlies; 21 games in 31 days, not alot of off time for Prequel. But this is a good thing--this is the largest 'project' I've ever attempted and went through 10 seasons in the time I usually go through a couple months of play. I'm going to update my original set of notes/plotlines/etc and tighten some of the storylines and get the next generation of characters drafted. I also have some ideas that may streamline some of the offseason work needed to keep this moving. I've also raided my late Aunt's baseball libary and have been doing more reading on this time period--one of my weakest as a baseball fan. Anyway, I've not gone, just been distracted by other things.
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Old 08-01-2005, 12:54 PM   #145
SelzShoes
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1879-1880 Offseason

“I must see Mr. McCormick now,” Aubrey Fairie believed he cut a dashing image in his finest suit. And he would have; if the shirt had been tucked in, the tie done properly, the jacket buttoned evenly, and the urine stain was not creeping down his leg.

Obie McCormick came out of his office to investigate the horrid smell from his lobby; the combination of cologne, vomit, and a 5-day whiskey bender had offended his senses to no end. “Oh,” McCormick intoned without a trace of surprise, “It is you Mr. Fairie.”

“You’re god dammed right it is me—and we have to talk.” Over the course of the past days, Mr. Fairie’s companions had drunk enough to convince the self-proclaimed “King of the Diamonds” that his worth was more than the $1,500.00 a year he was currently making. After all, a King has expensive taste in liquors; “only the best” was only affordable for two straight days. News of the Columbia Association’s new salary limit had convinced the wunderkind the need for a raise.

In fact, he demanded it out right.

“$2,500.00—you’ve been a starter for one season, what makes you think you deserve such a fee?”

“I am the King—the King deserves the best.”

“You sir are a drunkard—now go get yourself some coffee and sleep.”

“If I don’t get what I want, I’ll, I’ll”

“You’ll what?”

“I’ll jump leagues! They will pay me what I’m worth.” Aubrey smiled triumphantly at his decision.

“And you shall make less than you do now.”

Aubrey, sensing there was an insult in the comment, grabbed for the ornamental sword mounted to the wall. Thankfully for Mr. McCormick, the blade and plaque was firm to the wall, leaving the drunken catcher swinging from the handle. McCormick called for his secretary to notify security. “Please escort Mr. Fairie home, and be sure he does not frequent any place he may partake in hard spirits.”
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Old 08-03-2005, 10:21 PM   #146
Dark Horse
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Followed you over from another board.

i've been lurking over here for a while.

Just wanted to say i'm glad you kept this story going.

Keep up the good work. :eatpop:
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Old 08-09-2005, 05:09 PM   #147
SelzShoes
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Join Date: Apr 2005
1879-1880 Offseason

Bath and a new suit were the only things on his mind. As Aubrey Fairie stumbled out of the train, the late afternoon sun revealed his shambled state; including a stench even he wanted to escape.

“Boy, what town is this?”

The teen shook his head and point to a sign above his head: Louisville.

“Good,” Aubrey thought, “a whiskey town.”

Quickly, he made for the business district, hoping to catch a tailor before the close of business. The man was closing shop—even threatening to call the constable to arrest such an obvious ruffian, but the pile of greenbacks changed his mind. The suit would be ready in the morning, and the clothes provided would do until then. The tailor’s kid even escorted him to one of the nicer hotels in the area—with private bath and gentleman’s club attached.

The snooty concierge was reluctant to offer a room to a man in his state, but “money always turns pride,” as his father used to say. A shave was arraigned and a bath drawn. Yes, all those ‘well-bred’ f*cks turned to jelly when he flashed his money.

Except bastards like McCormick who treated him like property, like some common ---.

He hoped the club had a jacket and tie policy, like so many of those Chicago bastards. Some overpaid powder-puff would try to keep him out; he’d cause a scene and when the members realized who he was; he’d walk in, escorted by ranking members as that snooty f*ck looked on shamed.

As the blade cleaned his whiskers, a smile overcame him. “I’m going to own this town.”
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Old 08-09-2005, 05:12 PM   #148
SelzShoes
High School Varsity
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Horse
Followed you over from another board.

i've been lurking over here for a while.

Just wanted to say i'm glad you kept this story going.

Keep up the good work. :eatpop:
Nice to see both you and ifspuds stopping by! I do miss you guys.

Last edited by SelzShoes : 08-09-2005 at 05:14 PM.
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Old 08-09-2005, 05:41 PM   #149
Izulde
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Excellent post there, Selz. One of the better ones in this dynasty thus far, I think.
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Old 08-18-2005, 04:44 PM   #150
SelzShoes
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Join Date: Apr 2005
1880: Treason with Honor

From the Chicago Eagle
Shocking Development at Lakefront Grounds
Everything but game for Opening Day


A parade, brass brand and all the usual spectacle of opening day was on display at the home of our Chicago Empires. Everything but the scheduled opponents; the Indianapolis Base Ball Club.

The Browns, already reeling from the illegal contract jumping of Aubrey Fairie to the Louisville entry in the outlaw Columbia Association, had received a wire indicating the day’s challenger were en route, but delayed. A check of the railroad logs, after an indeterminable delay, indicated the hoosiers had formulated a hoax, and never were in route to Chicago.

To their credit, the Chicagos quickly recruited an amateur nine for an exhibition and offered full refunds to the gather crowd, one of the largest in recent memory. “I know not if the Indianapolis club has folded or is trying to gain some sort of advantage,” said field captain Aron Mousser. “But I do assure the sporting public of Chicago, we shall gain vengeance on the field of honor.”
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