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Old 02-06-2018, 02:31 PM   #101
cartman
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Less than 15 minutes to the Falcon Heavy launch

Falcon Heavy Test Flight | SpaceX
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Old 02-06-2018, 02:56 PM   #102
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Wow.
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Old 02-06-2018, 03:12 PM   #103
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Those two stages landing back in tandem was really impressive.
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Old 02-06-2018, 03:27 PM   #104
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Those two stages landing back in tandem was really impressive.

This.

Still trying to find word if the main booster made it.

Last edited by Coffee Warlord : 02-06-2018 at 03:27 PM.
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Old 02-06-2018, 06:44 PM   #105
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That was so freaking cool I got goose bumps watching it.
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Old 02-06-2018, 07:23 PM   #106
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How in the world do they do that? Wow.
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:25 AM   #107
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Still trying to find word if the main booster made it.

https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/6/16...failed-landing
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Old 03-10-2018, 06:44 AM   #108
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Beats me as to real implications but thought it was a neat story.

Scott Kelly: NASA Twins Study Confirms Astronaut's DNA Actually Changed in Space
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Astronaut Scott Kelly’s DNA was altered by a year in space, results from NASA’s Twins Study have confirmed. Seven percent of his genes did not return to normal after he landed, researchers found.

Scott Kelly and his twin brother, Mark Kelly—also an astronaut—were the subjects of the study that sought to find out exactly what happens to the body after a year in space.
:
:
In 2017, researchers discovered that the endcaps of Scott Kelly’s chromosomes—his telomeres—had become longer while he was in space. Further testing confirmed this change, and revealed that most of the telomeres had shortened again within just two days of his return.

After landing, 93 percent of Scott Kelly’s genes returned to normal, the researchers found. The altered 7 percent, however, could indicate long-term changes in genes connected to the immune system, DNA repair, bone formation networks, oxygen deprivation and elevated carbon dioxide levels.

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Old 03-10-2018, 06:52 AM   #109
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wow - being a twin, I was more than a little curious as to the results of this experiment. Hope his altered genes don't cause him major problems down the road. Wonder how they can protect this from happening to other astronauts now.
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Old 03-10-2018, 07:57 AM   #110
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I wonder if this means evolution/adaptation may occur quicker in space than on earth (I guess that makes sense). It would be neat if they can definitively identify what the chromosome changes impact.
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Old 05-21-2018, 03:46 PM   #111
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Pretty interesting.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/21/world...tem/index.html
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For billions of years, it lived in our solar system without us even knowing it was there. But this object couldn't remain hidden around Jupiter forever. It was just peculiar enough to be noticed by researchers.

In 2017, the first observed interstellar visitor, an asteroid named 'Oumuamua, was found traveling through our solar system. Now, for the first time, astronomers have discovered a permanent resident that moved in during the early stages of our solar system's development, about 4.5 billion years ago.

The researchers call this exo-asteroid, known as 2015 BZ509, an "interstellar immigrant." It's known as an exo-asteroid because it originated outside our solar system.
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At first glance, 2015 BZ509 is just one of many objects orbiting the gas giant Jupiter in a stable configuration called a resonance. Though all of the planets and most of the objects in our solar system orbit the sun by moving in the same direction, the exo-asteroid is going its own way. 2015 BZ509 moves in the opposite direction in a retrograde orbit.

"The asteroid and Jupiter take the same amount of time to complete one orbit around the Sun but one moves clockwise and the other counter-clockwise so they pass by each other twice per each full orbit," Morais wrote.

"This pattern is repeated forever -- it is a stable configuration -- in a simplified model with only the Sun, Jupiter and the asteroid. We saw that when we include the other planets it is still very stable, over the solar system's age."

That orbit is the same path the object has always followed, meaning it could not have formed in our solar system. If it were "native" to our solar system, it would have inherited the direction from the gas and dust that formed all of the other planets and objects.
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Old 05-21-2018, 03:53 PM   #112
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Just shows again how little we really know about the science of space.
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Old 06-07-2018, 02:19 PM   #113
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Interesting I guess but somewhat underwhelming.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/06/07/us/na...ngs/index.html
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Organic matter has been found on Mars in soil samples taken from 3 billion-year-old mudstone in the Gale crater by the Curiosity rover, NASA announced Thursday. The rover has also detected methane in the Martian atmosphere.

The search for life outside Earth focuses on the building blocks of life as we know it, which includes organic compounds and molecules -- although these can exist without life. Organic matter can be one of several things: a record detailing ancient life, a food source for life or something that exists in the place of life.

No matter its purpose, these work as "chemical clues" for researchers about Mars.
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Old 07-10-2018, 09:29 PM   #114
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Israel to launch its first spacecraft to the moon | Fox News

JEWS IN SPACE!
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Old 07-11-2018, 10:00 PM   #115
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It would be pretty impressive accomplishment. More symbolic than practical I guess, more of a middle finger.
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Old 07-25-2018, 01:21 PM   #116
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Pretty cool.

Now we need to get Bruce Willis and his drill team to bring up some of that water to see if there are life forms.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/25/world...nce/index.html
Quote:
A lake of liquid water has been detected by radar beneath the southern polar ice cap of Mars, according to a new study by Italian researchers from the Italian Space Agency, published Wednesday in the journal Science.
:
It sent radar pulses through the surface and polar ice caps and measured how the radio waves reflected back to Mars Express.

Those pulses reflected 29 sets of radar samples that created a map of drastic change in signal almost a mile below the surface. It stretched about 12.5 miles across and looked very similar to lakes that are found beneath Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets on Earth. The radar reflected the feature's brightness, signaling that it's water.
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Old 07-25-2018, 01:35 PM   #117
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Neat!
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Old 09-23-2018, 07:49 AM   #118
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Nice job Japan.

It would be kinda "bad" if the Japanese found the first extraterrestrial amoeba/fossil though, the US would never live it down. But it's all science ...

https://www.cnn.com/2018/09/22/asia/...oid/index.html
Quote:
The Japanese space agency JAXA said it made history Saturday by successfully landing two unmanned rovers on an asteroid.

"The two rovers are in good condition and are transmitting images and data," a JAXA statement said after the rovers separated from the Hayabusa2 spacecraft and landed on the asteroid Ryugu.

The rovers are collectively known as MINERVA-II1. The space agency reported that MINERVA-II1 is the world's first mobile exploration robot to land on the surface of an asteroid.
:
The 1 kilometer-wide space rock, which is shaped like a diamond, is expected to be "rich in water and organic materials," allowing scientists to "clarify interactions between the building blocks of Earth and the evolution of its oceans and life, thereby developing solar system science," JAXA said in a statement.

A series of specially designed cameras -- four on the first rover and three on the second -- will take stereo images of the asteroid's surface. The rovers are also equipped with temperature gauges and optical sensors as well as an accelerometer and a set of gyroscopes.
:
A third rover called MASCOT will be launched from Hayabusa2 in early October.

Later in the mission, scheduled for the end of October, the spacecraft will land on the asteroid after blowing a small crater in it using explosives, so samples that haven't been exposed to space can be gathered from below the object's surface.

After examining the far distant object and taking samples, Hayabusa2 will depart Ryugu in December 2019 before returning to Earth by the end of 2020 with its cargo of samples.

If successful, JAXA has said it will be the "world's first sample return mission to a C-type asteroid."

Japanese scientists are racing NASA for that achievement, with the US agency's sample retrieval mission due to arrive back on Earth in 2023.
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Old 09-28-2018, 09:08 AM   #119
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Some nice pics.

I'd say Bruce Willis got it right in Armageddon.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/09/28/asia/...ntl/index.html
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Old 11-24-2018, 06:23 PM   #120
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This should be cool. Hope its as successful as its predecessors.

https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science...ead-ncna939076
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When its Curiosity rover landed on Mars in 2012, NASA called the last, most perilous phase of the rover's descent "seven minutes of terror."

Now the space agency's Mars InSight lander is a day away from its own slightly more compressed touchdown on the red planet. This time, NASA says the final phase of the spacecraft's landing will last about six and a half minutes and members of the InSight team are trying to contain their rising anxiety.

"Its a little less terror," jokes Rob Grover, who leads the team in charge of InSight's landing at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

InSight, which is designed to study the red planet's deep interior, is scheduled to plunk down on the Martian surface on Monday at around 3 p.m. EST, after traveling more than 300 million miles since its launch in May from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.
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Old 11-26-2018, 10:52 AM   #121
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Lander arrives on Mars around 2 pm-hope it makes it!
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Old 11-26-2018, 04:12 PM   #122
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Congrats NASA.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/11/26/world...day/index.html
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After seven months of traveling through space, the NASA InSight mission has landed on Mars. A few minutes after landing, InSight sent the official "beep" to NASA to signal that it was alive and well, including a photo of the Martian surface where it landed.

Mission Control at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory exploded into celebratory applause and cheers after the touchdown was confirmed. The landing was watched around the world and even broadcast live on the Nasdaq Stock Market tower in New York City's Times Square.
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Old 11-26-2018, 09:26 PM   #123
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Welcome to Mars (again)


InSight Is Catching Rays on Mars | NASA
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Old 12-07-2018, 01:20 PM   #124
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I give you the sounds of Mars:


NASA InSight Lander 'Hears' Martian Winds – NASA's InSight Mars Lander
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Old 12-07-2018, 03:09 PM   #125
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That's pretty cool
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Old 12-07-2018, 11:51 PM   #126
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That is pretty cool (but it sounds like regular wind to me).
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Old 01-02-2019, 02:16 PM   #127
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Okay, its cool we were able to do this, human ingenuity and all.

But com'on, its just a rock. Can we start more serious exploration of Saturn/Jupiter/moons with water.

Nasa's New Horizons: 'Snowman' shape of distant Ultima Thule revealed - BBC News
Quote:
The ice world known as Ultima Thule has finally been revealed.

A new picture returned from Nasa's New Horizons spacecraft shows the little world to be two objects joined together - to give a look like a "snowman".

The US probe's images acquired as it approached Ultima hinted at the possibility of a double body, but the first detailed picture from Tuesday's close flyby confirms it.

New Horizons encountered Ultima 6.5 billion km from Earth.

The event set a record for the most distant ever exploration of a Solar System object. The previous mark was also set by New Horizons when it flew past the dwarf planet Pluto in 2015.

But Ultima is a further 1.5 billion km further out.

The mission team has decided to call the larger lobe "Ultima" and the smaller lobe "Thule". The volume ratio is three to one.

Jeff Moore, a New Horizons co-investigator from Nasa's Ames Research Center, said the pair would have come together at very low speed, at maybe 2-3km/h. He joked that if they were cars, "you probably wouldn't fill out the insurance form.

Ultima orbits the Sun in a region of the Solar System known as the Kuiper belt.

There are hundreds of thousands of Kuiper members like Ultima, and their frigid state almost certainly holds clues to how all planetary bodies came into being some 4.6 billion years ago.
:
:
The hope is that the course of the spacecraft can be altered slightly to visit at least one more Kuiper belt object sometime in the next decade.

New Horizons should have just enough fuel reserves to be able to do this. Critically, it should also have sufficient electrical reserves to keep operating its instruments into the 2030s.
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Old 01-02-2019, 03:13 PM   #128
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yeah seems pretty insignificant as far as planetary objects go, but still an accomplishment for further distance away from Earth. Just wish we'd get the tech for clearer pictures of stuff that far out.
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Old 04-10-2019, 09:18 AM   #129
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This is the first-ever picture of a black hole. Thank the Event Horizon Telescope. - Vox


goes way over my head as far as 'understanding', but definitely qualifies as amazing.
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Old 04-10-2019, 10:01 AM   #130
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wow
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Old 05-06-2019, 07:30 PM   #131
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This is some pretty cool shit right here. In case you wanted a reason to ponder your place in the galaxy.

Quote:
Astronomers have put together the largest and most comprehensive "history book" of galaxies into one single image, using 16 years' worth of observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The deep-sky mosaic, created from nearly 7,500 individual exposures, provides a wide portrait of the distant universe, containing 265,000 galaxies that stretch back through 13.3 billion years of time to just 500 million years after the big bang. The faintest and farthest galaxies are just one ten-billionth the brightness of what the human eye can see. The universe's evolutionary history is also chronicled in this one sweeping view. The portrait shows how galaxies change over time, building themselves up to become the giant galaxies seen in the nearby universe. This ambitious endeavor, called the Hubble Legacy Field, also combines observations taken by several Hubble deep-field surveys, including the eXtreme Deep Field (XDF), the deepest view of the universe. The wavelength range stretches from ultraviolet to near-infrared light, capturing the key features of galaxy assembly over time. The video begins with a view of the thousands of galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and slowly zooms out to reveal the larger Hubble Legacy Field, containing 265,000 galaxies.


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Old 05-06-2019, 08:25 PM   #132
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Space. Is. Big.
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Old 05-07-2019, 07:12 AM   #133
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Space. Is. Big.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy has this to say on the subject of space,

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space."
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Old 06-15-2019, 06:13 AM   #134
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I was one that thought going back to the moon was a waste of funds and would have preferred to focus on Mars. But this is a stepping stone, to learn from it and apply it to future (Mars) missions which makes perfect sense (e.g. prototyping before a build).

China has already reached the moon and have said they want to send rover to Mars. Sooner or later, there's going to be a first manned mission to Mars and I prefer it to be the US.

However, unlike the 60's to 90's, there are now viable private sector companies that can help or augment NASA, and it would be great if they can be leveraged.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/13/tech/...mis/index.html
Quote:
NASA has touted its bold plan to return American astronauts to the moon by 2024 for months. Now we're starting to get an idea of how much it will cost.

The space agency will need an estimated $20 billion to $30 billion over the next five years for its moon project, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine told CNN Business on Thursday. That would mean adding another $4 billion to $6 billion per year, on average, to the agency's budget, which is already expected to be about $20 billion annually.
:
NASA wants that mission to include two astronauts: A man and the first-ever woman to walk on the moon.
:
The overall goal of the Artemis program is to establish a "sustainable" presence on the moon, paving the way for astronauts to return to the surface again and again. Learning to live and work on another world, Bridenstine said, will prepare them for NASA's long-term mission: to put people on Mars for the first time in human history.
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Old 06-15-2019, 06:34 AM   #135
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Yes the race to monetize the moon as a supply point for Mars will be big. Speaking of the moon, this is a fantastic story about it and the challenges it presents.



https://www.wired.com/story/moondust...nar-ambitions/
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