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Old 06-17-2021, 12:21 PM   #17
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Re: OBPS

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Originally Posted by ktd1976
No, it is not. It literally measures the number of bases, in a percentage, that a player gets per at bat. It removes walks, hit by pitches, etc. It only goes by the at bats in which a player gets a hit, or makes an out.

The formula for slugging percentage is literally total bases from hits divided by at bats. (1B+2B*2 + 3B*3 + HR*4)/AB

It is a literal percentage of bases per at bat.
No it literally is not. A percentage tells you how often you do something, where as the formula for slugging is telling you the average.

If you even look up the definition for slugging percentage most sites will tell you itís named incorrectly.

ďThe name is a misnomer, as the statistic is not a percentage but an average of how many bases a player achieves per at bat. It is a scale of measure whose computed value is a number from 0 to 4.Ē

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slugging_percentage

ď While the name of the stat is ďslugging percentage,Ē the name itself is slightly inaccurate, as it is a ratio, or a so-called ďrate stat,Ē rather than a true percentage.Ē

https://coachingkidz.com/what-is-slu...e-in-baseball/

Sources like this can be found all over the internet. This is why is said itís a weighted average which isnít 100% correct either but itís closer to what it is than a true percentage.

In the end it simply tries to give people an idea of how often someone will hit XBH but it isnít exactly a one to one percentage as the name implies.
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Old 06-17-2021, 01:58 PM   #18
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Re: OBPS

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Originally Posted by Mackrel829
I'm not exactly sure what a weighted average but it occurred to me that slugging can, at the very least, be considered X percentage. .500 would mean you'd take 50% of a base each at bat, for example.

Slugging can be above 1.000 though, correct? You can't really take 120% of a base per at bat, but you can take 1.2 bases.
Slugging can be above 1.000 (or 100%) yes.

120% of a base is the exact same as 1.2 bases. It is still a percent. It's not weighted.
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Old 06-17-2021, 02:31 PM   #19
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Re: OBPS

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Originally Posted by ktd1976
Slugging can be above 1.000 (or 100%) yes.

120% of a base is the exact same as 1.2 bases. It is still a percent. It's not weighted.
That is literally average though. Just cause it is presented like .800 or 1.200 doesn’t mean it is a percentage. The weighted portion is cause each hit is worth more depending on how many bases.

Think of it as GPA. A class that has 2 credit hours is weighted less than a class that has 4 credit hours. Each hour makes the GPA of that class with less or more. That is the same thing with slugging.

How you use that numbers says that on average each at bat will have so many bases. If your slugging is .600 then each at bat you will get .6 bases. Could be more could be less, but that’s how average works vs percentage.

A percentage tells you EXACTLY how often something happened. OBP is an exact number, they were on base literally 43.5% of the time for a .435 OBP.

I know the numbers when we calculate look the same, but how they are used is not the same. One is telling you the exact frequency something occurs, ie percent and the other tells you an estimate of how many occurs per instance, ie the average.

To think of slugging as a percentage, despite its name, gives it an incorrect view of what it really is.

Last edited by ExarKub00720; 06-17-2021 at 02:40 PM.
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Old 06-17-2021, 05:07 PM   #20
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Re: OBPS

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Originally Posted by ExarKub00720
That is literally average though. Just cause it is presented like .800 or 1.200 doesnít mean it is a percentage. The weighted portion is cause each hit is worth more depending on how many bases.

Think of it as GPA. A class that has 2 credit hours is weighted less than a class that has 4 credit hours. Each hour makes the GPA of that class with less or more. That is the same thing with slugging.

How you use that numbers says that on average each at bat will have so many bases. If your slugging is .600 then each at bat you will get .6 bases. Could be more could be less, but thatís how average works vs percentage.

A percentage tells you EXACTLY how often something happened. OBP is an exact number, they were on base literally 43.5% of the time for a .435 OBP.

I know the numbers when we calculate look the same, but how they are used is not the same. One is telling you the exact frequency something occurs, ie percent and the other tells you an estimate of how many occurs per instance, ie the average.

To think of slugging as a percentage, despite its name, gives it an incorrect view of what it really is.
This is a useful explanation of a weighted average. I didn't have a secure understanding of what that was before but I feel like I do now.

To the poster above, I understand that 120% and 1.2 are the same. You can't take 120% of a base though. Once you've taken 100%, there's nothing left to take. The number doesn't make sense as a percentage, and the quoted post explains how it does make sense as an average.
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Old 06-17-2021, 08:32 PM   #21
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Re: OBPS

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Originally Posted by Mackrel829
This is a useful explanation of a weighted average. I didn't have a secure understanding of what that was before but I feel like I do now.

To the poster above, I understand that 120% and 1.2 are the same. You can't take 120% of a base though. Once you've taken 100%, there's nothing left to take. The number doesn't make sense as a percentage, and the quoted post explains how it does make sense as an average.
It does make sense as a percent though. Taking 1 base every at bat would be 100% Taking more than 1 base every at bat would be over 100%

It is also NOT a weighted average. The hits don't matter. Total bases are what are being measured.

Now, you can argue that it is an average, but it is still a percent.

Look at it this way. A player with a .500 SLG. On average they are getting 1/2 base each at bat. That is 50%. It is still a percent.

Just like Batting Average is an "average" but also a percent. Someone with a .330 batting average gets a hit 33% of the time.

But, at any rate, it is NOT a weighted average. Because someone who gets 2 singles (2 bases) would have the same SLG percentage as someone who got a double (2 bases) Each total base is treated equally.

What SLG is meant to show, is the QUALITY of the hits the player gets.
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Old 06-17-2021, 09:16 PM   #22
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Re: OBPS

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Originally Posted by ktd1976
It does make sense as a percent though. Taking 1 base every at bat would be 100% Taking more than 1 base every at bat would be over 100%

It is also NOT a weighted average. The hits don't matter. Total bases are what are being measured.

Now, you can argue that it is an average, but it is still a percent.

Look at it this way. A player with a .500 SLG. On average they are getting 1/2 base each at bat. That is 50%. It is still a percent.

Just like Batting Average is an "average" but also a percent. Someone with a .330 batting average gets a hit 33% of the time.

But, at any rate, it is NOT a weighted average. Because someone who gets 2 singles (2 bases) would have the same SLG percentage as someone who got a double (2 bases) Each total base is treated equally.

What SLG is meant to show, is the QUALITY of the hits the player gets.
Itís weighted cause each hit does have a weight to it. 3 singles and 1 triple may equal the same slugging but thatís the whole point. The one triple is literally worth more in the realm of this calculation. I have giving evidence shown how this is true shown why it isnít a percentage. I have literally studied for years in math and statistics to know the differences between the two.

It still though measures the quality of what a players at bats are. If someone has .650 slugging it means each at bat has a average of .65 bases. In a game of 4 at bats this means on average that player is going to get at least 1.3 bases could be they just hit one single could be a lucky day they get two singles maybe they just hit a double could be a home run and yes that means they went above and beyond 1.3 but as in all things averages have highs and lows, thatís why it is an average.

In the end the understand of how to use the slugging seems to be used for a player is correct for everyone so no real reason to keep rubbing in circles.
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Old 06-17-2021, 09:43 PM   #23
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Re: OBPS

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Originally Posted by ExarKub00720
It’s weighted cause each hit does have a weight to it. 3 singles and 1 triple may equal the same slugging but that’s the whole point. The one triple is literally worth more in the realm of this calculation. I have giving evidence shown how this is true shown why it isn’t a percentage. I have literally studied for years in math and statistics to know the differences between the two.

It still though measures the quality of what a players at bats are. If someone has .650 slugging it means each at bat has a average of .65 bases. In a game of 4 at bats this means on average that player is going to get at least 1.3 bases could be they just hit one single could be a lucky day they get two singles maybe they just hit a double could be a home run and yes that means they went above and beyond 1.3 but as in all things averages have highs and lows, that’s why it is an average.

In the end the understand of how to use the slugging seems to be used for a player is correct for everyone so no real reason to keep rubbing in circles.
Again, it is NOT weighted. Hits don't matter. TOTAL BASES do. Slugging percentage is NOT measuring hits. It is measuring how many total bases a player gets per at bat. Each base is weighted the same. Slugging Percentage is literally measuring how may bases a player gets, per at bat. HOW the player got those bases, DOES NOT MATTER. Thus, it is not a weighted average. It is literally TOTAL BASES/AT BATS.

I'm not denying that it is an average, but it is represented in percent form.

What it definitely is not, is a weighted average. The type of hit doesn't matter. Only the total bases matter.

30 singles is still just 30 bases. 10 triples is also 30 bases. Only the total number of bases a player gets is being measured. HOW he got those bases doesn't matter. Thus, the average is not weighted.

EDIT: I do see how some places do incorrectly attribute it to be a "weighted average" by saying that home runs have more weight than triples, triples more weight than doubles, etc. But, this is simply just not accurate. A home run is 4 total bases. A single is 1 total base. So, to figure out the slugging percentage (average) you take hits right out of the equation.

Example 10 At bats.
AB1=1 total base
AB2=2 bases
AB3=0 bases
AB4=0 bases
AB5=0 bases
AB6=4 bases
AB7=0 bases
AB8=1 base
AB9=0 bases
AB10=1 base

10 at bats. 9 total bases.

SLG pct.= .900

the average is not weighted. It is literally the number of bases the player got, divided by the number of at bats.

In order for it to be a "weighted average" certain "bases" would have to be given a greater weight.

In Slugging Pct (avg) each base is just one total base.

Last edited by ktd1976; 06-17-2021 at 10:16 PM.
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Old 06-17-2021, 10:22 PM   #24
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Re: OBPS

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Originally Posted by ktd1976
Again, it is NOT weighted. Hits don't matter. TOTAL BASES do. Slugging percentage is NOT measuring hits. It is measuring how many total bases a player gets per at bat. Each base is weighted the same. Slugging Percentage is literally measuring how may bases a player gets, per at bat. HOW the player got those bases, DOES NOT MATTER. Thus, it is not a weighted average. It is literally TOTAL BASES/AT BATS.

I'm not denying that it is an average, but it is represented in percent form.

What it definitely is not, is a weighted average. The type of hit doesn't matter. Only the total bases matter.

30 singles is still just 30 bases. 10 triples is also 30 bases. Only the total number of bases a player gets is being measured. HOW he got those bases doesn't matter. Thus, the average is not weighted.

EDIT: I do see how some places do incorrectly attribute it to be a "weighted average" by saying that home runs have more weight than triples, triples more weight than doubles, etc. But, this is simply just not accurate. A home run is 4 total bases. A single is 1 total base. So, to figure out the slugging percentage (average) you take hits right out of the equation.

Example 10 At bats.
AB1=1 total base
AB2=2 bases
AB3=0 bases
AB4=0 bases
AB5=0 bases
AB6=4 bases
AB7=0 bases
AB8=1 base
AB9=0 bases
AB10=1 base

10 at bats. 9 total bases.

SLG pct.= .900

the average is not weighted. It is literally the number of bases the player got, divided by the number of at bats.
(1B + 2Bx2 + 3Bx3 + HRx4)/AB that is the formula for slugging literally from mlb, https://www.mlb.com/glossary/standar...ing-percentage

Why is this important? It is showing from their own page that each hit you get an AB IS weighted. If you look at as you are and say did the AB get 1,2,3, or 4 bases then technically you are correct but how you get that is based on what kind of hit you got. This is why it is considered weighted when you do the math.

The only reason you knew how to find out how many plates some hitter got was by doing the math. You knew a home run was worth 4 plates and a single was worth 1 plate. If you didn’t know the math to know that you must multiply each hit by their weighted total of plates then you could have never found the total plates they got.

This is simply how Mlb has said the formula works, they say that you look at it as each hit is worth x points ie plates and then you add them up. This is why it is seen as weighted in that instance.

If we rewrite the formula then yes we can just say how many plates did you get per AB and that will in some ways take out the wording, but by definition you can’t get 2 plates without hitting one double. So in the realm of calculations that double impacted the slugging average making it higher than if it has been a single.

Last edited by ExarKub00720; 06-17-2021 at 10:46 PM.
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