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Old 04-25-2006, 04:44 PM   #1129
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Re: players not in the game caps

Quote:
Originally Posted by stalsy2310
yah its ok because i planned on using them with UR 6.3 and it looks like UR 6.3 isnt going to be out tonight.

Your three brewer CAPS are in UR 6.3, I just checked.
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Last edited by redsox04282; 04-25-2006 at 04:47 PM.
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Old 04-25-2006, 04:49 PM   #1130
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Re: players not in the game caps

itzmotto, I didn't copy down all the info I needed on Rivera, I'll be posting him and Scott Thorman tomorrow.

Here, by request, is Andy Barkett of the Richmond Braves.

Andy Barkett
Richmond Braves (AAA-Braves)
5 September 1974
1B/LF
L/L
1 Star
Heavy Rock

#31
6'1/205
Skinny
2-1-1-1

5-2-N-N-N-High-2-On
Open

Ratings:
47 43 46 44 20 60 65
51 10 60 65 50 65 55

Tendencies:
60 60 55 55 55 55
55 55 60 60 60 50
40 40 75 75 30 10

Zones
vs BOTH
CNC
HHN
CNN
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:43 PM   #1131
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Re: players not in the game caps

Your three brewer CAPS are in UR 6.3, I just checked

-Yah i just saw that last night, but they missed one player Michael Brantley LF-OF, he is son of former major leaguer OF mickey brantley that is the hitting coach at toronto now so he has some good blood. Heres some info on him,
http://www.brewerfan.net/ViewPlayerP...o?playerId=830

i cant find a pic on him so here is his dad lol
http://toronto.bluejays.mlb.com/NASA...staffid=111398
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Old 04-25-2006, 09:20 PM   #1132
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Re: players not in the game caps

can I get a cap for Adam Jones, CF prospect in Seattle
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Old 04-25-2006, 09:39 PM   #1133
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Re: players not in the game caps

I'm looking for these guys for the Cubs.

Darin Downs
Darin was considered a steal in the 2003 draft when the Cubs were able to get him in the fifth round. He was widely considered the second best high school pitcher in the draft. He has very good pitching instincts, and is considered very advanced fro his age. His fastball generally sits at 89-91 mph but is likely to gain speed as he grows more and into his frame. He has a real good curveball that is considered his go-to pitch. When he has had control problems, it has been his fastball that causes the bulk of his troubles. Look for 2006 to be a breakout season for Downs.

Analysis
Last season was Darin Downs' second with the Class-A Hawks following a short stint with the team in his rookie campaign one year earlier. It was also a second season of up-and-down's, as witnessed by a high ERA and an average of five-plus walks per start.
Downs, a fifth round draft pick out of Santaluces High School in Lantana, Fla., features a fastball, curveball, and changeup in his repertoire. Although the velocity of the fastball ranged from 90-92 mph last season, it was evident that Downs had trouble locating the pitch at times. Those struggles would lead to high walk totals and an inconsistent strikeout-to-walk ratio from start to start throughout 2004.
"His curve and changeup never posed a problem, but the fastball was hard to spot at times," said Hawks broadcaster Mike Safford.
In four of his thirteen starts last season, Downs' walk totals either equaled or exceeded his number of strikeouts. In a start against Yakima on August 6, the left-hander walked five in only one-plus inning without managing to record a strikeout.
After that start, however, he came on strong down the stretch. Downs walked ten and struck out twenty-one in his final five starts of the season. As the walk totals lowered, so did his ERA. Downs reeled off three straight victories in August while posting a 1.05 ERA in that span.
But what about Downs' curveball?
"It has the usual twelve-to-six motion, which was just filthy," said Safford. "In the end, though, his success will revert back to spotting the fastball.
"If he is able to locate both that and his changeup, he will get ninety percent of opposing hitters out with the type of breaking ball he possesses. The last month of the season, when he was on a roll, his curve was unhittable."
Now heading into his third season of minor league ball in the Cubs' system, Downs' youth is both his biggest strength and weakness according to Safford.
"He enjoys the game, certainly," Safford said, "but at times, he lost focus when he needed it the most. The upside is that he matured at the end of the season.
"The only glaring weakness, though, was his control, especially early on in the season. When he was having trouble spotting the fastball, he was working behind in the count and as a result, that's why his strikeout-to-walk ratio varied each start."
Over two-thirds of Downs' strikeouts on the year came away from Boise's home park: Memorial Stadium. He struck out forty-two on the road in 2004 while walking just seventeen. While pitching at home, however, Downs walked eighteen while fanning only nineteen.
One key in determining Downs' success will be how he matures as a player, Safford notes.
"As long as he continues to hit the weight room and improves his mental game, he should progress. Your physical abilities will only take you so far in this game, and it's all a mental game for him. He's a gifted athlete."
Downs led the Hawks' pitching staff last season with sixty-one strikeouts.
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Old 04-25-2006, 09:41 PM   #1134
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Re: players not in the game caps

Name: Donnie Veal
Position: Left handed pitcher
DOB: 9/18/84
Height: 6'3
Weight: 200
Bats/Throws: L/L

History: After an injury to his labrum cut into his playing time at the University of Arizona his freshman year, Veal transferred to Pima Community College, where he quickly became a Tucson superstar. Veal finished second in the (community college) Arizona League in strikeouts in 2004, and first in 2005. This prompted the Cubs to use their second overall pick on him in last yearís draft.

It wasnít just Vealís strikeout numbers that made him so attractive, however. Big lefties are always sought after, especially ones with the athleticism and arm strength that Veal has shown. Also, his effortless delivery reminds many scouts and coaches of six-time All-Star Vida Blue.

Upon joining the Cubs organization, Veal continued to strike out batters at an amazing rate, but has struggled at times with his control. He has been kept on a very careful pitch count, which makes sense given his inexperience. What coaches like most about Veal is his willingness to take advice on improving his mechanics to become a more consistent pitcher.

Pitches: Indeed, the velocity on Vealís fastball was very inconsistent before he was drafted. But now instead of hitting 90 on some days and as high as 97 on others, Veal is consistently in the 92-95 range with his four-seamer. There isnít a whole lot of movement on the pitch, but at that speed itís devastating when itís located well or when itís set up with his offspeed pitches.

His slider usually tops out in the low to mid 80ís, which is somewhat slower than what you would expect given the velocity of his fastball. This actually works to Vealís advantage, as the difference in velocity between his four pitches will keep hitters off balance. Plus, despite the relative slowness of the slider it still retains the hard break of a high-80ís slider.

Itís rare to find a pitcher as inexperienced as Veal have such an effective changeup.
Viewed in a vacuum, the pitch isnít spectacular, but because he throws his fastball so hard, it works wonders. This is also a pitch that will only improve as Veal becomes more deceptive with his delivery.

Finally, Veal features an average but improving curveball. Itís usually thrown in the mid-70ís, which is ideal, but Veal has a lot of trouble throwing it for strikes. Right now, it serves to set up his other pitches, but could become much more than that if he learns to locate it.

Prediction: I always feel that itís unfair to compare a prospect to a great like Vida Blue, especially this early in a career, because it sets the prospect up for disappointment. He feels the need to advance more quickly than is good for him just to live up to other peoples label. Fortunately, Veal appears to be handling it well, considering it an honor, but not thinking about it too much.
A lot of things could happen to Veal at this point. He might not ever build up the endurance to become a starter, and wind up as a lefty specialist out of the pen. On the other hand, Veal might develop his secondary pitches and become a legitimate four-pitch front-of-the-rotation starter. Iíll go on record as saying heíll be a starter, but that heíll have an up-and-down career as his control dictates, sort of a Jason Bere career path.

ETA: Being a second-round pick, Veal should be on the fast track to the Majors, particularly since their first-rounder, Mark Pawelek, has even less experience than Veal does. That being said, the Cubs organization is still reasonably deep in starting pitching, and Veal could get left behind if he struggles for a year or two. Even if his coachability allows him to advance through the system quickly, donít expect to see Veal on the 25-man roster until 2009 at the earliest.
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Old 04-25-2006, 09:44 PM   #1135
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Re: players not in the game caps

Name: Mike Billek
Position: Right Handed Pitcher
DOB: 03/04/1984
Height: 6'4"
Weight: 234lbs
Bats/Throws: R/R

History: Mike Billek has been up and down, and for once no one is referring to his weight. After his freshman season at the University of Central Florida Billek was as hot as any college prospect in baseball, but his sophomore season was one he spent frustrated and bored, coming into camp overweight and getting used less than he would have liked. His junior year he came back strong his junior season and the Cubs took him (with their second third round pick) in the 2005 draft as much for what he shows now, namely a Major League body, as what he might show in the future, late inning dominant stuff.

Some have said the Cubs should make that switch, from starter to reliever, now, but in his first year the Cubs kept him where he was comfortable, in the starting rotation. How long that will last will be largely dependent on how long Billek remains effective in the role. Though he averaged less than five innings a start in his first season in pro ball, that has less to do with stamina, and more to do with a club protecting their new investment.

What was a curse for Billek, getting less time his sophomore year, might have been a blessing for the Cubs, who find essentially one year less of wear and tear on a top pitching prospect. Still raw and at times too willing to just throw as hard as he can instead of 'pitching,' the Cubs will look to see how much polish he comes back with after an offseason. The move to the bullpen could come as early as spring of this year, and if it does, expect the Cubs to fast track him.

Pitches: Billek, like many college pitchers, has three pitches, and knows how to throw two. His fastball has gotten marquee billing since being one of the top high school pitchers in Florida, sitting in the 90-91 range but amping up to 95 occasionally, another reason many believe he's destined for the pen. He has a curveball, and sharpening it was a focus in his first season with the Cubs. He'll come back this spring with either a more conventional 12-6 curve, or a harder pure slider, and the Cubs would prefer the slider.

Billek throws a changeup, but rarely and without much confidence. Like most pitchers, it will be the primary focus of year two, and it's development will be key if he wants to remain a starter. He toyed with several grips last season and will spend much of this offseason deciding on one he can throw with the same arm action, and throw for strikes.

"You'd really like to see him pitch one inning a game," our scout said, "because you could see the extra velocity when he got in a jam. When he needed it there was an extra gear to the fastball, and even the slider got better, because he'd get charged and throw it harder. As a starter he just has to hold back to make sure something's in the tank."

Prediction: Billek is groomed as an eventual replacement for Ryan Dempster, and the conversion starts almost immediately. That means that Billek will be a starter for a few more months, and then move to the back of the bus, and start throwing that fastball at 95 consistently. His mentality seems to suit it, and his willingness to go right after the best fastball hitters in his league suits it. If he develops the changeup faster than most (i.e., within a year) it could keep him in the rotation perhaps as long as another year, but even if it is an above average pitch, it only makes him more dangerous as a late inning reliever.

ETA: Because he'll be late inning material, and because he'll turn just 22 as camp gets started, the Cubs have no reason to rocket him through the system, but he might do it anyway. He was pitching in Lo-A in his first pro season, and while that certainly isn't unheard of, it also isn't exactly the norm. His combination of pluses, including a mid 90s fastball, Major D1 program experience, a fresh arm, and an MLB ready body, are rarely found, and often too much time in the low minors can do nothing but screw guys like that up. He'll probably start at Lo-A this year, and could see time in West Tennessee before the season's over. A full year at Double-A will follow, but by 2008 he'll be knocking on the big league door, and asking where to put his toothbrush.
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Old 04-25-2006, 09:47 PM   #1136
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Re: players not in the game caps

Name: Justin Berg
Position: Right handed pitcher
DOB: 06/07/1984
Height: 6'5"
Weight: 205lbs
Bats/Throws: R/R

History: When the Cubs traded Matt Lawton after having him for about 20 minutes, the move left many in the bleachers scratching their heads. After all even with the emergence of Matt Murton it seemed strange to give up an experienced left handed bat, especially when it appeared the Cubs greatest weakness was going to be at the top of the order. The reasoning was pretty simple, the Cubs knew they were going to be in the running for both Rafael Furcal and Juan Pierre during the offseason, Lawton was an expensive rental who was underperforming, and there is nothing quite as special as a talented pitcher.

Justin Berg came to the Cubs from the Yankees for Lawton, and the Cubs have high hopes for him, though admittedly they aren't really sure what those hopes are. Berg has been a starter, middle reliever, set up man and closer in his season and a half of professional ball, and shown aptitude in virtually every role. That uncertainty might not bode well for a Triple-A 26 year old, but as a 21 year old who in 2006 will be just tasting Hi-A for the first time, it makes him an even more exciting prospect.

Pitches: Why is Berg such an intriguing prospect? He's 6'" and the Cubs do not have to teach him to use that to his advantage. His fastball sits 89-91MPH and has a natural sink and he's learned that a good solid slider, that starts eight feet in the air and finishes in the dirt down and away, is an effective pitch to everybody, righties and lefties alike. Like virtually all long limbed pitchers control has been something of an issue, but not the kind of problem that makes scouts worry.

"He's figured two things out on his own that a lot of clubs have to spend years drilling into pitcher's heads," a scout that watched Berg in the NY/Penn State League says, "He learned how to use his height, and he learned that strikeouts are overrated."

Berg pitches to contact, and as long as he keeps the ball down when he does, he will become a valuable asset for the Cubs in whatever role they decide to use him in. The final piece of the puzzle will depend on what role they choose. If the Cubs elect to keep Berg at the back end of the bullpen, as a set up man or closer, than his fastball/slider repertoire should be fine, but if they intend on keeping him in the starting rotation, he will need to develop more confidence in a change up that has been fantastic at times, but is certainly inconsistent.

Prediction: Let the grooming begin. Closers with low 90s fastballs are few and far between, but in many instances those pitchers are actually preferred for set up roles. A lot of Berg's future will depend on how much progress he's made with the changeup, but if he still lacks confidence in that pitch coming into the '06 season, expect the Cubs to start looking at him as their set up man of the future. Still young, and just coming into a new organization, the even money says he's going to begin the season in Lo-A with Peoria, but a good run could earn him a promotion and quick.

Though that changeup could change everything. The Cubs asked him to continue working on it during the offseason, and if it is a much improved pitch when he shows up at camp, he could be sent to Hi-A Daytona as a member of the starting rotation from Day One. If he remains in the starting rotation he could actually move more quickly, since the Cubs have traded many of those standing in his way.

ETA: Pitchers as young and talented as Berg, but without upper 90s fastballs are given time to develop, and Berg will need a few years to prove himself on bigger stages. Expect a nice long gestation period, that sees Berg end '06 in Hi-A regardless of his role. He will likely need a year at each level to prove his control and movement are enough to get more advanced hitters out, and he will probably never be listed in the Top 10 of this list. None the less solid progression should see Berg getting a big league opportunity by his 25th birthday, perhaps sooner if the Cubs finally commit to him in the bullpen.
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