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Animations & Ratings, how they go hand in hand

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Old 07-16-2013, 08:27 PM   #41
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Re: Animations & Ratings, how they go hand in hand

One thing i will add: If they can make speed pressure sensitive instead of it either be on or off that can improve the animations a lot i think. If I am sprinting full speed and do a spin move the animation should be different and more awkwardly than me doing it half speed same with jukes, hurdles, stiff arms. If the speed mechanics match with how hard or how far down a user holds the turbo(trigger) then that in itself should add a plethora of animations to the game. Not everyone runs a route full speed, not every play requires someone to run 90 miles a hour, gotta have speed but with control. If you dont know what i mean play a racing game, holding the trigger all the way down makes u drive full speed. Slightly holding makes you drive slower than full speed. Not to mention with them adding in a stamina bar makes more sense to add different levels of acceleration (whatever that is) and overall speed of the game.
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Old 07-16-2013, 08:50 PM   #42
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Re: Animations & Ratings, how they go hand in hand

One of the best posts I have ever seen written on this site..

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Old 07-17-2013, 12:13 AM   #43
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Re: Animations & Ratings, how they go hand in hand

Great work as always. I completely agree with the obsolete value of route running by the way. How can such an important trait be so undervalued in the game? All you need is a player with good agility to break in and out of routes, and they will run routes like Jerry Rice. A player with high route running should be consistently more open than players with low ratings plain and simple.

Also, in my opinion, AWR should matter for user-controlled quarterbacks. It makes up a large part of the OVR, and it should have an effect. I look at AWR as the "Consistency Rating." Currently, THA serves as how often the QB throws it on target. If you throw the ball 10 times with a 63 THA rated QB, then he would only complete it about 3 times (if passing accuracy actually had some disparity). However, accuracy should not be how often a QB hits his receiver, but rather the location of his throws. An accurate passer in the game should be able to throw passes where only the receiver can get it, while inaccurate passers should throw it off target and out of reach. This is where AWR comes in. AWR should determine how often a QB reaches his THA level, or the consistency of his throws. For example, Aaron Murray is a very accurate passer, one of the best in the league, but his completion percentage isn't as high as other accurate passers because he is inconsistent at times with his throws. His THA would be around a 92 in my opinion, but his AWR should only be about an 85. Even the most accurate passers don't throw their best passes every single play, and AWR should represent how often they reach their potential.

THP should not only affect how far a QB can throw, but also how fast the ball gets to the receiver. I've taken a 77 rated THP QB and tested him against a 96 THP QB, and the 77 rated QB actually threw a bullet out pattern 0.12 seconds faster than the 96 rated QB. (Obviously this is completely hand timed, but the point is that there is no difference in ball speed.) A QB with high THP should be a great advantage. They should be able to fit the ball into tighter windows because of the strength of the throw. They should be able to throw faster passes that cover less ground. They should be able to throw on the run better since they have stronger arms, and they should be able to throw farther.
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Old 07-17-2013, 12:29 AM   #44
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Re: Animations & Ratings, how they go hand in hand

wow great read now i understand a little better
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Old 07-20-2013, 08:23 PM   #45
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Re: Animations & Ratings, how they go hand in hand

Quote:
Originally Posted by DucksForever
Great work as always. I completely agree with the obsolete value of route running by the way. How can such an important trait be so undervalued in the game? All you need is a player with good agility to break in and out of routes, and they will run routes like Jerry Rice. A player with high route running should be consistently more open than players with low ratings plain and simple.

Also, in my opinion, AWR should matter for user-controlled quarterbacks. It makes up a large part of the OVR, and it should have an effect. I look at AWR as the "Consistency Rating." Currently, THA serves as how often the QB throws it on target. If you throw the ball 10 times with a 63 THA rated QB, then he would only complete it about 3 times (if passing accuracy actually had some disparity). However, accuracy should not be how often a QB hits his receiver, but rather the location of his throws. An accurate passer in the game should be able to throw passes where only the receiver can get it, while inaccurate passers should throw it off target and out of reach. This is where AWR comes in. AWR should determine how often a QB reaches his THA level, or the consistency of his throws. For example, Aaron Murray is a very accurate passer, one of the best in the league, but his completion percentage isn't as high as other accurate passers because he is inconsistent at times with his throws. His THA would be around a 92 in my opinion, but his AWR should only be about an 85. Even the most accurate passers don't throw their best passes every single play, and AWR should represent how often they reach their potential.

THP should not only affect how far a QB can throw, but also how fast the ball gets to the receiver. I've taken a 77 rated THP QB and tested him against a 96 THP QB, and the 77 rated QB actually threw a bullet out pattern 0.12 seconds faster than the 96 rated QB. (Obviously this is completely hand timed, but the point is that there is no difference in ball speed.) A QB with high THP should be a great advantage. They should be able to fit the ball into tighter windows because of the strength of the throw. They should be able to throw faster passes that cover less ground. They should be able to throw on the run better since they have stronger arms, and they should be able to throw farther.
hit the nail on the head. great post.
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Old 07-21-2013, 01:36 AM   #46
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Re: Animations & Ratings, how they go hand in hand

Quote:
Originally Posted by DucksForever
Great work as always. I completely agree with the obsolete value of route running by the way. How can such an important trait be so undervalued in the game? All you need is a player with good agility to break in and out of routes, and they will run routes like Jerry Rice. A player with high route running should be consistently more open than players with low ratings plain and simple.

Also, in my opinion, AWR should matter for user-controlled quarterbacks. It makes up a large part of the OVR, and it should have an effect. I look at AWR as the "Consistency Rating." Currently, THA serves as how often the QB throws it on target. If you throw the ball 10 times with a 63 THA rated QB, then he would only complete it about 3 times (if passing accuracy actually had some disparity). However, accuracy should not be how often a QB hits his receiver, but rather the location of his throws. An accurate passer in the game should be able to throw passes where only the receiver can get it, while inaccurate passers should throw it off target and out of reach. This is where AWR comes in. AWR should determine how often a QB reaches his THA level, or the consistency of his throws. For example, Aaron Murray is a very accurate passer, one of the best in the league, but his completion percentage isn't as high as other accurate passers because he is inconsistent at times with his throws. His THA would be around a 92 in my opinion, but his AWR should only be about an 85. Even the most accurate passers don't throw their best passes every single play, and AWR should represent how often they reach their potential.

THP should not only affect how far a QB can throw, but also how fast the ball gets to the receiver. I've taken a 77 rated THP QB and tested him against a 96 THP QB, and the 77 rated QB actually threw a bullet out pattern 0.12 seconds faster than the 96 rated QB. (Obviously this is completely hand timed, but the point is that there is no difference in ball speed.) A QB with high THP should be a great advantage. They should be able to fit the ball into tighter windows because of the strength of the throw. They should be able to throw faster passes that cover less ground. They should be able to throw on the run better since they have stronger arms, and they should be able to throw farther.

Speaking from experience watching quarterback controversies between guys with a big arm and no anticipation, feel for the game, and little touch, versus guys with average arms who made quicker decisions, it should be pointed out that guys with bazookas also suffer from a lot more drops from either assaulting their receiver with the ball, the receiver not expecting the ball/looking for it in time because he didn't think he was open, or worrying about a safety/linebacker taking his head off. Football's a complicated game with a lot of different layers of skills and lots of subtle variables. Hard to reproduce it.
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